2001 London A~ea Transport Survey - Pilot Results and Future Directions



2001 London A~ea Transport Survey - Pilot Results and Future Directions

Authors

COLLOP M, Transport for London and BUCKINGHAM C, Greater London Authority, UK

Description

New structures for regional government in London have been set up. Since 3 July 2000, London has been governed by an elected Mayor and an elected assembly, the Greater London Authority. The Mayor and GLA will set the strategic framework within which the e

Abstract

New structures for regional government in London have been set up. Since 3 July 2000, London has been governed by an elected Mayor and an elected assembly, the Greater London Authority. The Mayor and GLA will set the strategic framework within which the existing local authorities, the 32 London boroughs and the Corporation of London, will operate. In the transport field, the Greater London Act 1999 places a duty on the Mayor ~to develop and implement policies to promote and encourage safe, integrated, efficient and economic transport facilities and services to, from and within Greater London'. Responsibility for delivering transport services in London, within this strategic framework, is given to a new executive body, Transport for London. For the first time, a single organisation has the powers to develop and implement integrated, multi-modal, solutions to the capital's travel problems. These changes are certain to generate new interest in transport planning for the capital.

Good planning needs good data. A major data collection exercise, the London Area Transport Survey (LATS) will take place in 2001. LATS 2001 is the latest in a series of large-scale travel surveys in London whose history dates from the London Traffic Survey of 1962. The series was continued by the Greater London Council, with the Greater London Transportation Surveys (GLTS) of 1971 and 1981. After the GLC was abolished in 1986, the Department of Transport (DOT) and the London Boroughs (represented by the London Research Centre) cooperated to mount LATS 1991. The Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR), as successor to DoT, initiated planning for LATS 2001, again in cooperation with the LRC and under the direction of a Steering Group on which were represented all the bodies with responsibility for transport planning for London. In July the LATS Unit transferred from DETR to TfL, and LRC was absorbed into the GLA to provide research services to the Mayor and Assembly.

Publisher

Association for European Transport