Trade-off Across Privacy, Security and Surveillance in the Case of Metro Travel in Europe



Trade-off Across Privacy, Security and Surveillance in the Case of Metro Travel in Europe

Authors

SUNIL PATIL, RAND EUROPE, DIMITRIS POTOGLOU, RAND EUROPE, PETER BURGE, RAND EUROPE

Description

Our paper presents findings from pilot data collected from three EU Member States as part of the initial empirical phase of PACT as well as evidence from qualitative focus groups. The empirical research approach uses Stated Preferences to elicit the preference of respondents regarding the security & privacy characteristics of various aspects of urban metro travel. The stated preference exercise gathers responses relating to whether people engage with trade-offs across different travel alternatives involving CCTV features, data storage and sharing and access to data. Responses will be used to estimate discrete choice models to identify willingness to pay for different security features which might provide the perception of improved security and for those which pose a lesser threat to privacy. For example, how much are travellers willing to pay to use the metro whilst being subjected to CCTV with improved abilities to protect privacy? Through analysis at Member State level, we will also aim to answer questions such as whether security and privacy perceptions differ across Member States. Analysis of qualitative data from the focus groups in London, Vilnius and Athens will provide information on how people relate to the topics of privacy, security and surveillance in the case of public transport by identifying their awareness, knowledge, attitudes perceptions, interests and behaviour.
When complete, PACT will provide input for decision-takers and policy makers regarding how to invest in security whilst being mindful of the implications for privacy and data protection.

Abstract

With the ever evolving landscape of security concerns regarding transportation infrastructure, there has been an extensive public debate about how individual preferences can be incorporated into the policy decisions concerning investment in security technologies, which aim to provide a greater level of security to travellers. This debate is especially pertinent where such security infrastructures have the potential to impinge upon privacy. The European PACT Project – Public Perception of Security and Privacy: Assessing Knowledge; Collecting Evidence, Translating Research Into Action aims to investigate these issues further. This will be done by gathering preferences of individuals from the 27 EU Member States concerning different versions of an urban transport scenario. PACT is a multiyear project financed under the EU’s Framework 7 Programme.
Our paper presents findings from pilot data collected from three EU Member States as part of the initial empirical phase of PACT as well as evidence from qualitative focus groups. The empirical research approach uses Stated Preferences to elicit the preference of respondents regarding the security & privacy characteristics of various aspects of urban metro travel. The stated preference exercise gathers responses relating to whether people engage with trade-offs across different travel alternatives involving CCTV features, data storage and sharing and access to data. Responses will be used to estimate discrete choice models to identify willingness to pay for different security features which might provide the perception of improved security and for those which pose a lesser threat to privacy. For example, how much are travellers willing to pay to use the metro whilst being subjected to CCTV with improved abilities to protect privacy? Through analysis at Member State level, we will also aim to answer questions such as whether security and privacy perceptions differ across Member States. Analysis of qualitative data from the focus groups in London, Vilnius and Athens will provide information on how people relate to the topics of privacy, security and surveillance in the case of public transport by identifying their awareness, knowledge, attitudes perceptions, interests and behaviour.
When complete, PACT will provide input for decision-takers and policy makers regarding how to invest in security whilst being mindful of the implications for privacy and data protection.

Publisher

Association for European Transport