Advanced Technology for Road User Charging Using Vehicle Positioning Systems



Advanced Technology for Road User Charging Using Vehicle Positioning Systems

Authors

CATLING I, lan Catling Consultancy, UK

Description

Road User Charging (RUC) is a key part of the Government's Integrated Transport Policy, and is the subject of a coordinated programme of research by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions.

Abstract

Road User Charging (RUC) is a key part of the Government's Integrated Transport Policy, and is the subject of a coordinated programme of research by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions.

The technology for RUC, or Electronic Fee Collection (EFC), has been developed in trials and real applications around the world over the last 15 years. The technology has been largely focused on Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC). The combination of satellite positioning, on-board processing and radio communications offers an alternative technology option for EFC, becoming widely referred to as "Vehicle Positioning Systems" (VPS).

The results of recent trials in Hong Kong indicate that this new approach is fast becoming a viable alternative to DSRC, particularly where there are concerns over the environmental intrusion of roadside DSRC infrastructure and where integration with other Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) applications is an important feature.

This paper describes VPS technology, discusses the development of VPS- based EFC systems in Germany, European research projects, Switzerland, Australia, the UK and in the Hong Kong Electronic Road Pricing Feasibility Study. It describes the INITIATIVE project which is demonstrating aspects of interoperability between DSRC and VPS-based EFC. It summarises the development of standards for VPS EFC within the ISO and CEN standardisation bodies. It compares the advantages and disadvantages of DSRC and VPS approaches, focusing in particular on cost and enforcement issues, it presents results from the various trials which have taken place, in particular from Hong Kong. It outlines the potential for integrating EFC with other ITS applications. It discusses the applicability of VPS to road user charging programmes around the world, including Denmark, Germany, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Australia and, in particular, the UK.

A discussion is presented of the particular issue of enforcement for VPS systems, which is more complex than for DSRC systems because enforcement points are not necessarily contiguous with charge points.

The paper concludes with a discussion of the relevance of VPS EFC to the current Integrated Transport Policy in the light of developments in Road User Charging in the UK.

Publisher

Association for European Transport