How to Reduce the Number of Short Trips by Car



How to Reduce the Number of Short Trips by Car

Authors

MACKE'B" R L, Centre for Transport Studies, University College London, UK

Description

The amount of travel by car is increasing, leading to a range of problems. According to the National Travel Survey (NTS) (Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, 1999) a quarter of all car trips are less than two miles long and more than

Abstract

The amount of travel by car is increasing, leading to a range of problems. According to the National Travel Survey (NTS) (Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, 1999) a quarter of all car trips are less than two miles long and more than half are less than five miles. There-is scope to transfer many of'these trips to the less-damaging modes of walk, cycle and public transport (particularly bus).

This paper presents some of the findings from a project entitled "Potential for mode transfer of short trips' which was Set up to address these issues. Some preliminary results have been presented previously (Mackett, 1999). The project has been carried out in the Centre for Transport Studies at University College London (UCL) in partnership with Steer Davies Gleave (SDG) for the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR). The overall objective of the work was to contribute to Government policy to encourage the use of the environmentally-benign travel modes in order to reduce the amount of travel by private car. The focus was on the encouragement of the use of walking, cycling and public transport (buses in particular).

The focus of this work is "short trips'. In this work these are usually taken to be those of less than 5 miles (8 kilometres). It should also be noted that this work concentrates on the alternatives to the car that car users perceive and what would make them choose them, rather than on the policies that might make them give up their cars, for example, road pricing. It should recognised that the actions identified in these surveys are unlikely, on their own, to reduce car use significantly, and that policies that increase the cost of using the car or restrict its use in some other way, would be necessary.

Publisher

Association for European Transport