Consumer Response to Sustainable Planning and Transport Policy Initiatives



Consumer Response to Sustainable Planning and Transport Policy Initiatives

Authors

COOPER J, DONEGAN K, RYLEY T and SMYTH A, TRI, Napier University, UK

Description

The premise on which this project is based is that informing the current policy debate and strategy development requires an insight into the consumer's decision making process and priorities in relation to lifestyle, rather than emphasis on simply the pot

Abstract

The premise on which this project is based is that informing the current policy debate and strategy development requires an insight into the consumer's decision making process and priorities in relation to lifestyle, rather than emphasis on simply the potential gains to be achieved from largely untested policy initiatives. Therefore, consumer response needs to be seen as central to any sustainable planning and transport policy initiatives. Consumer choice can be influenced by a variety of levers; most effectively those linked to some change in utility or cost rather than appealing to altruism.

Much of the focus of interest in sustainability relates to the apparently inexorable rise in the demand for car travel and the ability/desirebility to supply sufficient road space to meet demand. This rise in demand is fuelled more by the increased spatial separation of homes and workplaces, shops and schools than by any rise in trip making. However, the complexity of the links between the location of activities and the movement needed to underpin them is understood less clearly. The ECOTEC (1993) Report is an example of a study confirming that higher densities are associated with less travel. This is illustrated in Table 1. Differences in total distances travelled per week are linked to varying levels of car use and population density.

Publisher

Association for European Transport