Travel Demand Impacts of a New Privately Operated Suburban Rail in the Madrid N-Ill Corridor



Travel Demand Impacts of a New Privately Operated Suburban Rail in the Madrid N-Ill Corridor

Authors

MONZON A and GONZALEZ J-D, Universidad Politdcnica de Madrid, Spain

Description

The Madrid Region comprises three parts, namely the central core area with 2.9 million inhabitants, the inner suburbs with 1.6 million inhabitants and the rest of the region with 0.5 million. As regards current trends, today there is a strong tendency to

Abstract

The Madrid Region comprises three parts, namely the central core area with 2.9 million inhabitants, the inner suburbs with 1.6 million inhabitants and the rest of the region with 0.5 million. As regards current trends, today there is a strong tendency to move activities such as housing, industry and trade to the suburbs. Nevertheless, in spite the current trend, the central area still constitutes the main destination for most daily trips. These trips are served by 7 main corridors connecting the suburban and the central areas.

However, as can be inferred from figure 1 and table 1, there are big differences among the corridors. More particularly, the development of each of the 7 corridors has been based on their corresponding 7 radial motorways nation-wide, which link Madrid (the capital city of Spain) with all the other regions. On a general basis, the South has high population density considering the 1 million people in the area, a population segment belonging to medium-low economic level. The East and the North areas hoard most industrial developments, chiefly on account of the local airport and of the presence of several transport nuclei. These areas also have high population density, namely 384,000 and 215,000 inhabitants respectively. The Western N-VI corridor has been aimed to middle-high class developments exceeding 250,000 inhabitants. This corridor has come to be regarded as a green area because it acts as a link between Madrid and the forest area on the mountain range surrounding the capital.

By contrast, the N-Ill corridor shows lower development standards with only 56,000 inhabitants. This could be attributed to the fact that most waste sites from Madrid have been traditionally located by the Jarama river.

The share of bus demand remains in every case within a range between 20% and 25%. It is important to highlight that all the corridors in the area are served by bus and rail lines except for the N-I and N-Ill corridors. Car reliance appears to be substantially higher where rail services are non-existent, 73% in both cases, whereas in the Southern less favoured areas the percentage of car users exceeds 55%, reaching 63% in the other corridors. Summing up, we could affirm that there is a potential for rail services in the N-Ill corridor representing an average 13 -18% of the demand, which involves 14,000 to 20,000 trips per day.

Publisher

Association for European Transport