Carsharing, How to Make It a Success for All Players



Carsharing, How to Make It a Success for All Players

Authors

DERKSE C, Ministry of Transport (AVV), The Netherlands

Description

It is impossible to imagine life today in the Netherlands without the automobile. It is now common for almost every household to own one or more cars (CBS '97: 76.2%). This has become an acquired right that cannot be taken away easily from the Dutch. The

Abstract

It is impossible to imagine life today in the Netherlands without the automobile. It is now common for almost every household to own one or more cars (CBS '97: 76.2%). This has become an acquired right that cannot be taken away easily from the Dutch. The success of the car has also had a number of negative consequences, however. Congestion has worsened the accessibility of economic and city centers, parking problems have arisen and the environment has suffered. The strength of the car lies in what. it has to offer - it is there when you need it, you determine the route to be taken and it takes you from door to door. In short, it optimally fulfills the transport needs of the individual.

In spite of the dominant role played by the car, its uses are still insufficiently exploited. Statistics from the Census Bureau show that the car stands still for an average of 23 hours a day. The idea therefore arose in the early 90s to unlink the use of the car from its possession, in order to present the car itself as an alternative, in addition to the existing alternatives. By sharing a car, it can be used more flexibly and intelligently, while optimally fulfilling the transport needs of its users.

Shared car use, or carsharing, occupies an important place in government policy in the Netherlands in the total package of mobility measures intended to influence demand. These measures reinforce one another and together influence total mobility in the Netherlands. The different authorities each play their own role in this so called mobility management. The State is responsible for mobility on a national scale and the local authorities for their area. Together they formulate mobility policy.

A recent study has shown that there are 400,000 potential carsharers in the Netherlands. Carsharing providers and the authorities must take specific measures, however, to reach this number. This paper contains advice based on study results on how providers and authorities can stimulate carsharing. This paper has the following structure:

In chapter 2 is explained what carsharing means after which in chapter 3 the study set up is reported. The study results are reviewed in chapter 4. The paper ' ends with a synthesis in chapter 5.

Publisher

Association for European Transport