Rationale Behind Privatising Road Maintenance and Operation in the Accession Countries of Central and Eastern Europe



Rationale Behind Privatising Road Maintenance and Operation in the Accession Countries of Central and Eastern Europe

Authors

CORNWELL P, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

Description

During the 1990s, attention in the accession countries' transport sector focused largely on development of the Pan-European Corridor, for example:

Abstract

During the 1990s, attention in the accession countries' transport sector focused largely on development of the Pan-European Corridor, for example:

* the Crete and Helsinki Conferences enshrined the Corridors as instruments of "accession";

* the European Union (EU) PHARE Multi-country Programme commissioned vadous Corridor studies;

* the EU-supported TINA process (Transport Infrastructure Needs Assessment) developed estimates of the costs of upgrading the corridors to specified technical standards;

* the European Investment Bank (EIB) was given a mandate to lend substantial sums for Corridor improvements; and

* the EU-ISPA Programme has some MEUR 500 per year of grant financing available for Corridor improvements in the 10 Central European accession countries.

FAs a consequence, areas relatively neglected three have been in these countries, namely: (a) the upgrading and maintenance of non-Corridor road links, some of which are of major economic importance and carry higher traffic volumes than Corridor links; (b) road network operations and maintenance; and (c) opportunities to adapt EU experience (notably from Finland, Portugal and the United Kingdom) in mobilising private sector management and finance in the provision, upgrading, operation and maintenance of road infrastructure.

This paper explores the latter two areas and reports on current initiatives involving private sector participation in road operation and maintenance in the accession countries.

Publisher

Association for European Transport