Location Performance and Mobility Patterns Providing Empirical Facts for Policies Aspiring to Improve the Coherence Between Spatial Planning En Infrastructure Provision.



Location Performance and Mobility Patterns Providing Empirical Facts for Policies Aspiring to Improve the Coherence Between Spatial Planning En Infrastructure Provision.

Authors

Danielle Snellen, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Hans Hilbers, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

Description

The paper discusses how spatial en transport characteristics of locations in Dutch urban regions are related to their performance and travel patterns generated. This will provide more a factual basis for policies aiming for more coherence between spatial planning and transport provision.

Abstract

Dutch spatial and mobility policies, both on the national as well as the regional level, aspire to improve the coherence between spatial developments and investments in infrastructure en public transport supply in urban regions. Popular ways to achieve this are Transit Oriented Development and development of locations with multimodal access. The PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency is executing a research project into the conditions under which strategies like TOD can be successful. An extensive analysis of how urban regions function at this moment forms the first stage of this project. This analysis will provide facts regarding spatial en transport characteristics and the performance of locations within urban regions within the current Dutch context.

In this paper we report on some of the analyses executed in this context, focusing on employment development in relation to urban form and transport indicators. We aim to answer the following questions:
1. How does position within the urban region and the available transport supply relate to the performance of locations with regard to growth or decline of employment?
o Are locations with a specific position in a region and a specific transport supply mix more attractive than others?
o Are specific locations more attractive for some economic sectors than for other?
o Are there notable differences in development for locations with a similar transport supply yet a different position in the urban region?
2. How does position within the urban region and transport supply relate to characteristics of trips (modal split) to and from these locations?
o Are there notable differences in modal split for locations with a similar transport supply yet a different position in the urban region?
o Does multimodal access actually lead to a more balanced modal split or is the car still dominant as long as the position in the region and congestion levels allow for unrestricted car use?
3. How are changes in the spatial distribution of jobs related to changes in accessibility of jobs and commuting of workers?


Answering these questions for Dutch urban regions will provide more insights in the actual potential for success of spatial developments in coherence with transport supply. The paper will discuss the results of the analysis and draw conclusions in order tot provide a factual basis for policy making on more coherence between spatial planning an transport provision. The results will also feed into more elaborate research questions for the rest of the research project.

Publisher

Association for European Transport