Travel Demand Management: Lessons Learnt from the Olympic Games



Travel Demand Management: Lessons Learnt from the Olympic Games

Authors

Maeve Clements, Transport For London

Description

Transport for London and the Olympic Delivery Authority undertook a large scale Travel Demand Management programme of information and advice to encourage travellers in London to change their travel behaviour and avoid transport hotspots during the Games. The goal of this programme was to help the London transport network meet the additional demand for travel due to the Games and enable London businesses to continue to operate.

Research has been conducted before, during and after the Games to understand how effective the TDM programme was and identify any sustained change. This paper will present the findings and establish the lessons learnt for Travel Demand Management policy development including what has been learnt about managing demand on the public transport network during temporary periods of disruption, for example, during large scale construction projects, as well as any lessons we can learn about managing demand in the long term.

Abstract

Transport for London (TfL) and the Olympic Delivery Authority undertook a large scale Travel Demand Management programme of information and advice to encourage travellers in London to change their travel behaviour and avoid transport hotspots during the Games. The goal of this programme was to help the London transport network meet the additional demand for travel due to the Games and to enable London businesses to continue to operate.

TfL has undertaken a monitoring programme to understand the impact of the Travel Demand Management programme and identify its implications for policy development. The monitoring programme has looked at what measures were the most effective, the reasons why individuals made changes and their experience of these changes.

Early analysis has shown that there was a reduction in background (non-Games related) travel of 5 per cent during the Olympics Games, analysis of TfL’s Panel Survey of the London travelling population has shown that 77 per cent changed their travel behaviour during the Games. This suggests that many people made a little change to their travel during the Games. In total, 63 per cent reduced their travel by choosing not to make at least one of the journeys they would normally have made during the Olympic period. 28 per cent changed the time of some of their journeys, 21 per cent changed the route and 19 per cent changed mode at least once in the course of the Games.

After the Games, survey work has continued to explore whether there has been any sustained change in travel behaviour or attitudes.

London, in common with many major European cities, expects to see substantial population growth over the next two decades. Whilst schemes such as Crossrail, currently under construction, will provide additional public transport capacity, it remains challenging to cope with increased crowding and congestion on the network.

If, through the use of Travel Demand Management techniques, London travellers can be persuaded to travel at less busy times, to walk and cycle where possible, and to use alternative routes, and if London’s businesses can be persuaded to allow employees to work from home or work more flexible hours, the city’s transport network could operate more efficiently.

This paper will present the findings from this research and establish the lessons learnt for Travel Demand Management policy development including what has been learnt about managing demand on the public transport network during temporary periods of disruption, for example, during large scale construction projects, as well as any lessons we can learn about managing demand in the long term.

Publisher

Association for European Transport