WHY PEOPLE DO OR DO NOT TAKE THEIR BIKE IN SHORT TRIPS



WHY PEOPLE DO OR DO NOT TAKE THEIR BIKE IN SHORT TRIPS

Authors

M van Twuijver, Ministry of Transport (AVV); M Schreuders, Goudappel Coffeng, NL

Description

Abstract

The results of a research project will be presented on people?s choices of transport modes for short trips ? up to 7,5 kilometers ? in the Netherlands. Several trip purposes were taken into account. Main goal of the study was to gain insight in obstacles they experience for cycling -by taking a situational and an intra personal perspective: people make different choices in different situations, taking at one time their car and at another their bike. We asked them why. Results were discussed with local policy makers on how to implement the main conclusions in various towns in the Netherlands.

The study contained a literature review as well as empirical research: interviews (individual and households) and group discussions among 60 respondents, followed by a questionnaire among 1021 respondents. Target group were Dutch people over 18 with the disposal of a car in the household.

Next to information on their choices of transport modes in general, we zoomed in on their behavior in short trips. For five trip purposes: work related trips, bringing children to school or day care centers, shopping, going out in the evening, and sport or leisure activities, apart, we got results on their choices between car, bike and public transport.
These contain frequencies for each modality per trip purpose; moreover we asked for the deciding arguments people use while preferring the car over the bike and vice versa.
Hypothesed was that the frequencies and arguments would differ between trip purposes.

With respect to frequency, we found in general that car and bike compete closely on the short trips. Public transport plays a minor role. Differences were found between sexes, age groups, and towns with different population density.

With respect to the deciding arguments, we found among people who prefer cycling, an overall positive attitude towards cycling (nice, healthy, quick), while cars are taken for comfort reasons (lack of time, bad weather conditions, several trip purposes on a day).
With respect to the motives for car driving a confirmation of earlier research. But with the results of this study, we now know in which situations, which arguments are used.
And furthermore, we know witch groups of people (lifestyles, demographic features) use these arguments. The arguments are categorized in terms of their potential to be influenced by transport policies.

The main gain of the study lies in the detailed information it brings about for local policy makers in helping them stimulate cycling. Next to infrastructural aspects, communication and other ways to influence behavior are taken into account in the recommendations of this study.

Publisher

Association for European Transport