Activity-Based Approach for Modelling Travel Demand Accessibility in the Port Said City – Egypt



Activity-Based Approach for Modelling Travel Demand Accessibility in the Port Said City – Egypt

Authors

Mohamed Shahin, Alexandria University – Egypt, Marwa El-Bany, Port Said University – Egypt, Peter Davidson, Peter Davidson Consultancy

Description

This paper analyzes different accessibility options in the framework of an activity-based travel demand model

Abstract

Mobility in most Egyptian Cities is highly constrained by poor accessibility to main basic needs. Lack of adequate/sufficient access facilities such as parking, public transport system, and footpaths to different service centers is found to be responsible for the limiting of the freedom of mobility and the quality of life. These time constraints affect the activities which people make and should be incorporated into transport models of urban travel behaviour within Egyptian cities.

This paper analyzes different accessibility options in the framework of an activity-based travel demand model. Access needs for people are transformed into individual activities. A household survey is conducted for Port Said City in Egypt for different activities such as work, education, shopping, health and leisure. The results indicated the varying nature of these activities and that household heads are responsible for carrying out most out-of-home activities required to fulfill household needs. This places constraints on how the household head schedules his activities and/or how they are allocated to other household members.

A survey was undertaken comprising 5 focus groups and 100 in-depth attitudinal interviews which incorporated a series of stated and revealed preference games to determine and measure how households allocated their activities within household members and the effect of access to jobs, education, shops etc had on the activity and its scheduling. The stated and revealed preference survey was analysed to measure the activity allocation decisions in relations to accessibility, time, cost, mode and segmentation variables and a model developed to predict how households would decide.

The in-depth attitudinal stated and revealed preference survey sampled two distinct 'rich' and 'poor' areas of Port Said, Egypt. This was carried through into the analysis and different models were developed for each area separately. The 'rich' area model was applied to the sample of 'poor' area households so as to get a measure of how disadvantaged the 'poor' area was in terms of their value of time, access to jobs, education, shops etc.

This research is innovatory in applying stated preference to modelling household activities and their scheduling in different cultures and forecasting the effect of activity accessibility on 'quality of life'. It forms part of Port Said and Alexandria Universities in Egypt with the aim of understanding and modelling activity and travel decisions in different cultures.

Publisher

Association for European Transport