The Impact of Aircraft Weight on Aircraft Take-off Emissions



The Impact of Aircraft Weight on Aircraft Take-off Emissions

Authors

Nicolas Duchene, EUROCONTROL, INT

Description

The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of an aircraft take-off weight on its take-off and climb-out emissions.
Emissions of CO, HC, NOx, PM10 due to maximal and minimal take off weight are compared.

Abstract

This paper was written in the course of the ALAQS project (Airport Local Air Quality Studies) held by EUROCONTROL since 2003. The ALAQS project aims at defining best practice for conducting airport emission inventories and dispersion studies. As a consequence, a test bed toolset was developed: ALAQS-AV. One of the advantages of ALAQS-AV is its high flexibility which allows conducting emission calculations with various methods within the tool. Furthermore, ALAQS-AV output is expected to provide reliable input for a wide range of dispersion models: Gaussian, Lagrangian and Eulerian.

The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of an aircraft take-off weight on its take-off and climb-out emissions, which occur in the vicinity of airports and influence the airport local air quality. Obviously aircraft weight influences engine performances, which result in different climb profiles to reach an altitude of 3000 ft. The 3000 ft limit is a commonly accepted limit altitude for airport emission inventories. It is obvious that the greater the weight of an aircraft and the longer the time it takes to reach 3000 ft. However this is not considered in most actual air quality tools.

This paper compares the emissions due to maximal and minimal take off weight for widely used aircraft types (Yak 40, Boeing 747-400 and 767-300, Tupolev Tu-134, Airbus A320,?). Quantities emitted of CO, HC, NOx, PM10 are calculated and compared as well as the geographical extent of the exhaust areas. The climb profiles used in this study originated from the INM tool (Integrated Noise Model, FAA) which is used world wide for noise estimations at airports. They were implemented in the ALAQS-AV tool, developed on behalf of EUROCONTROL, to estimate airport emissions.

Results proved that the impact of take off weight on climb emissions is significant. In the worst case, emissions of NOx are almost doubled. The horizontal extent of the pollution goes from ~5 km to ~10 km for large jet aircraft.

Publisher

Association for European Transport