PASSENGER SATURATION FLOWS THROUGH PUBLIC TRANSPORT DOORS



PASSENGER SATURATION FLOWS THROUGH PUBLIC TRANSPORT DOORS

Authors

Rodrigo Fernandez, Universidad de los Andes, Alejandra Valencia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Sebastian Seriani, Universidad de los Andes

Description

The aim of this paper is the estimation of pedestrian saturation flows through public transport doors under different physical configurations by means of real-scale experiments at the Human Dynamics Laboratory at Universidad de Los Andes in Chile

Abstract

In previous papers presented at the ETC, Fernandez (2011) shown boarding and alighting times of passengers for the Transantiago system obtained at the University College London Pedestrian Accessibility and Movement Environment Laboratory (PAMELA). Previously, Fernandez et al (2010) analysed by means of a pedestrian microsimulator metro-bus interchange spaces in order to propose design guidelines, taking as case study a terminal station of Metro de Santiago. Following this line of research, the aim of this paper is the estimation of pedestrian saturation flows through public transport doors under different physical configurations by means of real-scale experiments made at PAMELA. Results presented in this paper are part of two projects funded by the Chilean Fund of Science and Technology (FONDECYT), aimed at understanding pedestrian behaviour at public transport facilities by means of artificial vision.

The saturation flow is a parameter using by traffic engineers to calculate the capacity of traffic signal junctions. For a given junction approach, the saturation flow is defined as the maximum discharge rate of a queue of vehicles during the effective green time of that approach. It is well-known that at the start of the green period there is a transient period before the discharge rate reaches its maximum, which is the saturation flow for that approach. If the queue remains until the end of the green time, there is another transient period until the start of the red time. The value of the saturation flow and transient periods depends on both the traffic composition and geometric characteristics of the junction approach.

Our previous research on bus boarding and alighting times suggest that a similar behaviour occurs though public transport doors. This hypothesis was tested by re-processing the 2008 videos for different door widths and platform heights. We used the approach of the Road Note 34 (RRL, 1963) for measuring passenger’s saturation flow. Values of passenger saturation flows and transient periods can be used by traffic engineers to estimate delays of public transport vehicles at bus stops and metro stations. This in turn can help architects in designing pedestrian facilities at transport infrastructures. The validation of our hypothesis can also help transport planners with the calculation of commercial speed, fleet size, type of vehicles, and operational costs of public transport systems.

We are conducting further real-scale experiments in the Human Dynamics Laboratory of University of Los Andes to analyse the discharge of a group of people through a public transport door with different physical configurations. we are using a mock-up of the hall of a public transport vehicle in our experiments. Some of the variables that have being studied are the effect of different door widths on passenger’s saturation flow.

Publisher

Association for European Transport