Mobility Management Through Communication for New Residents



Mobility Management Through Communication for New Residents

Authors

A Taniguchi, University of Tsukuba, JP; S Fujii, K Shimada,Tokyo Institute of Technology, JP

Description

In this study, we conducted 2 experiments to provide public transportation information to new residents who have just moved in an area. The result showed that the intervention was effective to reduce car use and increase public transport use.

Abstract

For development of sustainable transport system, it is essential to modify peoplefs attitude and behavior from overuse of car into use of other sustainable modes. Communicative transportation measures have collected attentions from transportation policy makers and researchers as soft transportation measure to change people's attitudes and car use behavior in EU countries, Australia, USA, and Japan. There are three major locations to implement such communicative measures, i.e., residential area, school, and workplace. Although communicative measures in residential area have been implemented through residential association and by sending materials by mail, the method is likely to cost high. Therefore, development of an effective and efficient method is strongly needed.
In literatures on travel behavior and psychology, it has been discussed that ghabit of car useh is a critical factor to prevent peoplefs behavior modification from car use into other modes use. Such discussion implies that individuals who have a strong habit of car use are not likely to modify their behavior. It is thus expected that communicative measures targeting those without car use habit would be much more effective than measures targeting those with strong car use habit. These discussions imply that communicative measures could much more effectively influence travel attitude and behavior of new residents who have just moved in than those of old residents. Thus, we conducted two experiments to test effectiveness of communicative mobility management measures targeting new residents who have just moved in.
An experiment in this study was conducted at Ryugasaki city (population is approximately 80,000), and the other was conducted at Takasaki city (population is approximately 300,000). The procedures for both experiments were same, and it was as below;
Step 1): A questionnaire (wave 1) was handed off to new residents who visit the city hall to submit their moving-in notification and they were asked to fill in the questionnaire at the moment.
Step 2): Immediately after we received the questionnaire from the new resident, we handed off to them the gnew comerfs bagh that includes a pamphlet for introduction of the city, major hospitals and garbage collection days, that was typical thing distributed to new residents in any Japanese cities. It should be noted that the bag usually does not include any information on public transport (PT). However, in these experiments, an information kit about PT system in the area was included in the bag. The kit was composed of bus route map, bus time table, an information sheet about a way to use the local bus system and bus craft postcard as a small gift. Note that new residents, who were randomly selected, received a bag which did not include an information kit on PT. They were regarded as those in control group in the experiments, and the other were regarded as those in experimental group.
Step 3): Six month after the wave 1 survey, a questionnaire was distributed (wave 2) to new residents in both experimental and control group.
In the experiment of Ryugasaki city, we distributed questionnaire in wave 2 to respondents of wave 1 (n = 104), and collected 46 (21 in experimental group, 25 in control group). Comparison of the travel behavior in wave 2 between experimental and control group indicated that frequency of car use with experimental group was significantly less (22.6%) than that with control group. It was also indicated that frequency of bus use of experimental group was much higher (818.7%) than that of control group, and frequency of train use was much higher (231.8%) than that of control group.
In the experiment of Takasaki city, we distributed questionnaire in wave 2 to respondents of wave 1 (n = 281), and collected 136 (108 in experimental group and 28 in control group). Comparison of the travel behavior in wave 2 between experimental and control group indicated that there was not significant difference between frequencies in control and experimental groups, frequency of bus use of experimental group was approximately triple of that of control group, and frequency of railway use of experimental group was approximately double of that of control group.
These result demonstrated that distributing the information kit on public transportation in an area to new residents was highly effective for mobility management measure that can promote environmental sustainable transport such as public transport system and that may reduce car use in the area.

Publisher

Association for European Transport