Plugging the Gap – Can Planned Infrastructure Address Resistance to Adoption of Electric Vehicles?



Plugging the Gap – Can Planned Infrastructure Address Resistance to Adoption of Electric Vehicles?

Authors

Austin Smyth, University Of Hertfordshire, Keith Bevis, University Of Hertfordshire

Description

This paper draws on evidence from experience gained by EValu8, a not for profit company set up by the University of Hertfordshire to run Source East, the East of England Plugged in Places (PiP) project.

Abstract

In 2012 approximately 120,000 Plug-in electric vehicles were sold worldwide, hardly inspiring confidence in the optimistic projections for such vehicles developed by makers like Nissan over the last few years. Moreover, while overall the UK car market saw its biggest growth in more than 10 years in 2012, achieving their highest volume since the credit crunch, after more than 2m vehicles were sold, and while overall sales of alternative fuel vehicles, including electric cars, increased by 9.4% (to almost 28,000), a record market share of 1.4%, take up off electric vehicles is less than 0.02% of the total market.

What are the key constraints to the growth of EV’s and how far can planned infrastructure and related measures encourage market uptake. This paper encompasses a review of literature/ evidence concerning:
• The current EV market, EV adoption scenarios and Independent projections of the future EV market
• Characteristics of EV early adopters and considerers
• Research on consumers’ purchase motivations and concerns and Willingness to Pay (WAP)
as a precursor to consideration of various EV adoption barriers, including:
• Technical barriers
• Business and institutional barriers
• Financial barriers
• Public acceptability
• Regulatory and legal barriers
• Commercial strategy barriers

Limited range is seen as a major barrier to consumer uptake of EVs. A major technological challenge for manufacturers is to increase range while keeping battery size and cost down. However, the issue of range cannot be divorced from the availability of charging facilities
Britain's network of charging points is expanding. At present electric cars cannot always be charged at points outside the zone from which they originate. However, the number in London will increase from 900 to 1,300 next year and electric car owners in the capital and the east of England can use points in both areas.

This paper draws on evidence from experience gained by EValu8, a not for profit company set up by the University of Hertfordshire to run Source East, the East of England Plugged in Places (PiP) project.

Publisher

Association for European Transport