Sustainable Innovations in Road Transport: Assessing the Impact of New Technology on Energy Use and Emissions



Sustainable Innovations in Road Transport: Assessing the Impact of New Technology on Energy Use and Emissions

Authors

M Uyterlinde, C Hanschke, P Kroon, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), NL

Description

Two scenarios describe the penetration of innovations in drive trains and alternative fuels in Dutch road transport, and their impact on CO2 emissions. Considered are e.g. (plug-in) hybrids, efficient tyres, biofuels, CNG/biogas and hydrogen.

Abstract

M Uyterlinde, C Hanschke, P Kroon, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), NL
In line with the European climate policy and going even further, the Dutch government has set ambitious
targets for greenhouse gas emission reduction by 2020. Therefore, it aims at accelerating the market
penetration of innovative technologies for sustainable mobility. This paper presents two innovation-scenarios
in terms of their impacts on energy use and CO2 emissions of technical innovations in drive trains and
alternative fuels in the Dutch road transport sector. The options considered are (plug-in) hybrids, efficient
tyres, intelligent transport systems, biofuels, CNG/biogas and hydrogen. The prospects of these options and
their conditions for success are discussed in detail. Emission reductions and costs are presented for the years
2020 and 2030, where the largest emission reductions are achieved with passenger cars, followed by delivery
vans. In relative terms, buses show the largest emission reductions.
The paper concludes that technical innovations in drive trains and alternative fuels can achieve substantial
CO2 emission reductions in the Dutch road transport sector. The cost effectiveness in terms of euro per ton
avoided CO2 depends on the development of fuel prices and on the extent to which economies of scale and
learning effects occur. Moreover, not all benefits can easily be quantified. The paper will also discuss which
further non-technical options for emission reduction exist, and the policies required to achieve a transition
towards a more sustainable transport sector. Since this takes several decades, early action is necessary, but
needs to be coupled to a long-term strategy with clear priorities. It also requires a balancing of different policy
objectives, such as CO2 emission reduction, energy savings, air quality and reduction of the dependence on
imported oil.

Publisher

Association for European Transport