Data Collection and Calibration of Passenger Service Time Models for the Transantiago System



Data Collection and Calibration of Passenger Service Time Models for the Transantiago System

Authors

R Fernández, M de los Ángeles del Campo, C Swett, Universidad de los Andes, CL

Description

TranSantiago is the name of the new public transport system implemented in Santiago de Chile in February 2007. It consists of a complete design of the bus network made of trunk and feeder services. Trunk routes are provided with few (4) metro lines, 18-m

Abstract

TranSantiago is the name of the new public transport system implemented in Santiago de Chile in February 2007. It consists of a complete design of the bus network made of trunk and feeder services. Trunk routes are provided with few (4) metro lines, 18-m articulated buses, 15 and 12-m buses with four, three and two doors, respectively. Feeder services consist of 8-m midibuses and 10-m buses with two doors. Trunk routes run on the main avenues while feeder routes use secondary roads. The former system was made of a dense radial network from extreme to extreme of the city with 10 or 12-m conventional two-door buses running everywhere.

The Passenger Service Time (PST) is the time that a public transport vehicle remains stopped transferring passengers. It depends on the number of boarding and alighting passengers, plus other operational characteristics such as the fare collection method, number of doors and steps, internal layout of vehicles, etc. Traditionally, the PST has been described as a linear function of the number of passengers boarding/alighting. We have been studied the PST of buses in Santiago de Chile since 1997. In the case of two-door buses we have found that the PST depends also on the vehicle occupancy, congestion on stop platforms, and number of passengers stored before the fare collection point inside the bus. We also found that the PST model is linear on parameters, but not necessary on explanatory variables. Parameters represent the boarding and alighting time per passenger and other times spent at stops, such as opening and closing doors.

With the change from the direct-route network to the trunk-feeder structure in Santiago de Chile, the system has changed not only in the design of vehicles (low-floor, multiple door buses) but also in the fare collection method. The fare is now collected by means of cards which are electronically read either inside the vehicle or in the bus stop (pre-paid zones). In addition, because of the metro system has became the main trunk service, it is suffering severe congestion inside the carriages (up to 7 pass per sq meter) as well as on platforms.

As a result, we have been involved in a research project founded by FONDECYT ? the Chilean equivalent to EPSRC ? called ?Experimental study of vehicle-passenger interactions at public transport stations?. One of its objectives is the data collection and calibration of a new PST model for the current operational conditions in both bus and metro systems. The aim is to use these new models for microscopic simulation of stop operations in order to improve the design and operation of bus stops and metro stations.

This paper describes first the TranSantiago system. Next, the way in which data where collected is explained. These where gathered by means of video recordings. The videos where analysed in two ways: metro videos where processed using an ad-hoc software; bus videos where processed manually. Then, results of the calibration of Passenger Service Time (PST) models for the various services of the TranSantiago system are presented and its new functional forms are discussed. Finally, the consequences for the management of TranSantiago operations derived from the new PST formulations are examined. The paper will be of interest for people working in transit agencies on design and evaluation of novel services as well as for scholars involved on modelling public transport operations.

Publisher

Association for European Transport