Rail Market Research in the CIS



Rail Market Research in the CIS

Authors

BROWN M, Halcrow Fox, TEO C, Halcrow Transmark, UK, DUNKEL C-D, EPV-GIV, Germany and PEKHTEREV F S, Giprotranstei, Russia

Description

The railways of the former Soviet Union represented the world's most extensive and intensive transport operation. The break-up of the USSR, accompanied by economic instability and uncertainty, has posed major problems to the region's rail operators as rai

Abstract

The railways of the former Soviet Union represented the world's most extensive and intensive transport operation. The break-up of the USSR, accompanied by economic instability and uncertainty, has posed major problems to the region's rail operators as rail traffic has undergone major reductions. It has also posed major challenges to those attempting to plan a modern rail transport system to serve the emerging market economies that have replaced the former Soviet states.

The European Union, through the TACIS programme, is providing a wide range of assistance to the former Soviet states (the CIS), including the railway sector. A recent TACIS project involved developing a passenger and freight demand model for the western part of the CIS. The project included a large market research survey amongst rail passengers, probably the first such survey to have been carried out on a large scale within the CIS. This paper reports the results of this market research exercise.

The project, of which the market research formed a part, was focussed on inter- regional rail transport on a number of major, strategic corridors. The study area, shown in Figure 1, included the independent states of Moldova, Ukraine, Belarus and the western part of Russia (effectively, that area west of Moscow).

The rail corridors addressed by the study are the carriers of existing major traffic flows and have been identified by the various states as likely to form the basis of a future strategic rail network.

Both passenger and freight forecasting models were developed for these corridors. Whilst large quantities of traffic data were made available by the various local railways, additional information was required to complete the passenger model; hence the requirement for market research.

The following sections describe the data collection procedures and the results of the market research.

Publisher

Association for European Transport