International Barriers to the Multimodal Distribution of Goods in Europe



International Barriers to the Multimodal Distribution of Goods in Europe

Authors

TAVASSZY L, TNO Institute of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development and HAMERSLAG R, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Description

The shaping of Europe's transportation system is a fascinating and complex problem. In an era of disappearing barriers we are faced with the need to accomodate freight flows that are structurally changing. The effects of traffic on the economy and the env

Abstract

The shaping of Europe's transportation system is a fascinating and complex problem. In an era of disappearing barriers we are faced with the need to accomodate freight flows that are structurally changing. The effects of traffic on the economy and the environment call for improvements in infrastructure networks and their utilization. Any new perspective must involve the possibility of a new balance of freight flows among alternative modes of transport. It requires also proper scales of simplification of reality, however, to describe existing and future patterns of freight movements in Europe.

The impact of the integration of national economies on international freight transport flows is one of the key issues in European transportation policy. In general, it is anticipated that an increase will take place of these flows, along with shifts in the structure of freight movements, both in terms of the patterns of international trade and the balance among modes of transport [see Group Transport 2000+, 1990; Cooper, 1992; ECMT, 1995]. The requirements for the allocation of infrastructural means (to ensure interconnectivity and interoperability of national and modal networks) will in part be guided by these changes in freight transport demand.

The main objective of our study concerns the design and application of a transportation model to study the effect of decreasing border barriers on trade and transport within Europe. The specification of the model is described in the following chapter. We adopt a formulation for transport costs which accounts for the regional access and egress costs of different transport modes and for international barriers to the distribution of goods. The methodological aspect of the estimation of the model parameters is discussed in chapter 3. The results of a case concerning Western Europe are given in chapter 4. For purposes of illustration, chapter 5 presents a projection of freight flows for a barrier-free Europe. We conclude the paper in chapter 6.

Publisher

Association for European Transport