Designing a Road Freight Model to Assess Impacts of a French HGV Road Charging Scheme



Designing a Road Freight Model to Assess Impacts of a French HGV Road Charging Scheme

Authors

H Huard, SETRA, FR; P Samblat, CETE du Sud Ouest, FR

Description

The paper goes more thoroughly into the model technical features and highlights how each of these features contribute to provide some very useful insights regarding the charging scheme design. It also sets out a sample of the model outcomes.

Abstract

Likewise Germany and the LKW-Maut scheme, France is currently working on implementing a distance-based toll for Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) on most of the currently free of charge trunk road network by 2012. It is expected that the road charging scheme to be put in place makes HGVs pay appropriately for the French road network investment and operating costs, reduces environmental impacts of road freight in having influence on shippers mode choices, and generates revenues to build new transport infrastructure. In addition to the distance run on the road network, The toll scheme ?"eco-redevance" in French ? will depend on HGVs dimensions and emission standards, indiscriminately to the HGV's origin.

The paper will present the evolution of the freight model that was developed to contribute to designing the scheme main features . The choice of a modelling approach arose from distinct needs:
- Defining the road network to be charged
- Designing toll locations on the defined network
- Evaluating the amount of revenue generated
- Anticipating the charging scheme impacts on HGV traffics
- Assessing the increase of road transport costs

A freight transport model (called MONAPL) was subsequently designed in order to respond to the various needs of the Ministry for Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea. The model represents 150 000 km of the French road network and distinguishes 29 types of roads with respect to technical features such as incline, width, number of lanes, etc. Most of the other European countries road networks are also taken into account. The Origin-Destination matrix of transport demand is calculated from both French and European institutional traffic surveys (CAFT, Transit, TRM France and Europe), and local initiatives. Among data sets used for the model calibration, traffic assignment results were compared to the French HGV national survey (undertaken by S├ętra). This survey displays the amount of traffic (in veh-km) per category of HGV and per type of network at specific locations on the French road network.

The paper goes more thoroughly into the model technical features and highlights how each of these features contribute to provide some very useful insights regarding the charging scheme design. It also sets out a sample of the model outcomes.

Publisher

Association for European Transport