The Gateway Concept: Park-and-ride Facilities to Encourage the Use of London Underground



The Gateway Concept: Park-and-ride Facilities to Encourage the Use of London Underground

Authors

RICHARDS J and RICKARD J, Oscar Faber, UK

Description

London Transport (LT) currently operate 65 car parks, largely located in the outer fare zones of the London Travelcard zoning system, providing a total parking capacity of approximately 11,400 spaces. LT generally welcomes parking at stations as part of i

Abstract

London Transport (LT) currently operate 65 car parks, largely located in the outer fare zones of the London Travelcard zoning system, providing a total parking capacity of approximately 11,400 spaces. LT generally welcomes parking at stations as part of its policy of encouraging people to travel by London Underground, providing that this does not decrease the length of the Underground journey taken and that there is a net revenue gain. The provision of car parks is viewed as beneficial both as a service for existing customers and as a mechanism to attract additional patronage from those who currently drive into central London. A primary aim of LT's current car park planning policy is to encourage some of the 150,000 people who currently drive into central London each day to divert to the Underground.

On this basis London Transport are interested in establishing the potential of developing car parks in the outer fare zones where land costs are relatively low and generated fare revenues are potentially relatively high.

In particular, LT are interested in assessing the feasibility of developing park-and-ride at so-called "Gateway" stations. The Gateway concept would be a departure from the current LT parking provision. Gateway stations would be highly accessible from the primary route highway network and incorporate a number of facilities that would be potentially attractive to existing car users. Each Gateway car park would provide significantly more spaces than at present with higher quality facilities than currently provided. This would mean the provision of a secure enclosure with clearly marked spaces and aisles for circulation, flood lighting, surveillance cameras, ticket issuing machines and payment machines at exit that would be quick to operate and user-friendly.

For the link between car and Underground, walkways would be designed for safety from circulating traffic, and quick access to the station via weather protected walkways.

LT commissioned consultants Oscar Faber to assess the potential for the development of a number of sites to Gateway standards. In the course of the study Oscar Faber have developed an evaluation framework to consider an appropriate means for assessing the potential of sites as Gateways, and a method for selecting a short list of those worthy for more detailed study. This paper gives an overview of the approach adopted.

Publisher

Association for European Transport