City Logistics and Urban Passenger Transportation ? Comrades or Competitors?



City Logistics and Urban Passenger Transportation ? Comrades or Competitors?

Authors

D Cakic, University of Novi Sad, RS; R Witzig, Technische Universit√§t M√ľnchen, DE

Description

We analyze the impact of logistics and passenger transport measures on their respective individual goals, to detect possible compensation effects as well as synergies. We use a qualitative system analysis in order to point out critical actions.

Abstract

"City logistics and urban passenger transportation are often treated separately from each other. At the same time, both have a common main goal, which is moving goods or people from A to B in a maximum efficient way. In reality, each discipline is subject to individual planning instruments. In consequence, individual actions to improve city logistics could counteract goals aimed for by passenger transportation planning, and vice versa. In this research, we analyze the impacts of logistics and passenger transport measures on their respective individual goals. That way we want to detect possible compensation effects, as well as synergies. This could contribute to the development of an integrated planning approach for city logistics and passenger transportation in the future.
In order to identify common and counteracting effects of city logistics and transport planning, we perform a case study in the city of Novi Sad. Being the second largest city of the transition country Serbia, there is currently a very dynamic development in city logistics, as well as in passenger transport.
In a preliminary investigation, we analyze the current transport volumes in Novi Sad, as well as the planned major actions to improve traffic, transit and logistics in the future. These include the building of transport infrastructure as well as the introduction of laws, restrictions and other policies to improve single aspects of transport. In this context, we focus on the complex situation that has been developed during the last decade. Many shopping centers opened in the city center have changed the parking and transport structure massively. In the next step, we perform a qualitative system analysis to elaborate the effects on other system elements of the city?s transport concepts. Implementing a measure to improve the processing of goods traffic could induce more traffic in the city and lead to more congestion ? a consequence that both passenger and goods transport have to share. On the other side, actions to reduce car traffic in order to make cities more livable, e.g. restricted parking zones, could be a burden to city logistics. We connect these and more examples to a system analysis in order to point out critical actions.
Furthermore we compare the obtained results to situations in other cities. Urban areas of bigger size and with a higher grade of industrialization are facing different problems which are encountered with different actions. For example, low emission zones in German cities are a consequence of long lasting exceeding of emission limits in urban areas. Due to European Union Laws, several German cities were forced to introduce this action, which bans high emission vehicles from the city center. This action which is commonly appreciated by passenger transport planners, poses a high difficulty for freight service. While today the Non-European-Union city of Novi Sad does not have to face these restrictions, this example shows that a city?s transport planning must always anticipate future challenges.
The obtained results give an insight into the synergies and competitive impacts of different actions to improve city logistics and urban passenger transport. In further research this could help to elaborate integrated planning instruments for goods and passenger transport."

Publisher

Association for European Transport