Modelling Passenger Exchange at Crossrail Stations



Modelling Passenger Exchange at Crossrail Stations

Authors

C Harmer, Crossrail, UK

Description

This presentation reports on work undertaken by Crossrail and their consultants into the use of pedestrian modelling to analyse passenger transfer between platform and train.

Abstract

This presentation reports on work undertaken by Crossrail and their consultants into the use of pedestrian modelling to analyse passenger transfer between platform and train.

The use of micro-simulation models during the design phase of infrastructure construction and reconstruction delivers tangible benefits and has become a mainstream activity during design development.

Crossrail was an early user of ?Legion? dynamic simulation software. Legion is a multi agent model where the movement of autonomous individuals is based on minimum ?dissatisfaction?.

As modelling software becomes more sophisticated, so greater demands are placed on modelling capability. Understanding passenger transfer between platforms and rolling stock is an area which requires these software capabilities.

The purpose of this work is to inform the Rolling Stock Requirements specification, by evaluating different vehicle layouts with respect to their ability to deliver the required dwell times.

The presentation will outline the modelling assumptions and methodology used to analyse passenger transfer, and present the modelling results to date. The models derived from this study can subsequently be used for the benchmarking of rolling stock supplier bids.

This study is concerned with the appraisal of two different ten car train layouts: Two doors per carriage and three doors carriage.

In both cases the unobstructed open door width is 1500mm. It should also be noted that the three door vehicle as shown will only provide 446 seats per ten car train, not 450 seats as in the project requirements.

The results show that the intermediate cars (carriages 2-9) of the 3 door rolling stock design perform significantly better than the 2 door rolling stock design.

In relation to the 2 door rolling stock design: In 2016 an Effective Door Open Time (EDOT) of 21 seconds would allow 99% to alight and 90% of passengers to board. In 2016+20% an EDOT of 21 seconds would only enable 96% to alight and 70% of passengers to board.

In relation to the 3 door rolling stock design: In 2016 an EDOT of 21 seconds would only enable 100% to alight and 99% of passengers to board.

In 2016+20% an EDOT of 21 seconds would only enable 100% to alight and 98% of passengers to board.

Publisher

Association for European Transport