Can We Achieve Real Transport and Land Use Integration? a Review of Current Methods and Approaches



Can We Achieve Real Transport and Land Use Integration? a Review of Current Methods and Approaches

Authors

G Dodds, S Turnbull, Jacobs Consultancy, UK

Description

While Governmental, legal and other process will differ across Europe, this paper will focus on three levels of activity that have common application in transport appraisal.

Abstract

Co-ordinating land-use and transport planning continues to be a challenge facing professionals. The focus on masterplanning and regeneration can place significant requirements on transport systems that are already operating close to, or at, capacity. The interaction with the statutory environment of development plans, policies and legal agreements has given professionals a major challenge in finding mechanisms and methodologies that support Government's objectives, while safeguarding the operation of the network.

The Scottish Government has recognised the need to integrate the transport appraisal process more actively within the Development Planning process, and has issued guidance for consultation to assist policy makers and practitioners alike.

While Governmental, legal and other process will differ across Europe, this paper will focus on three levels of activity that have common application:

- alignment of plans and policies;
- development of analytical process; and
- delivering the successful outcome.

Considering alignment, the paper considers how and why land-use planning and transport plans are or become non-aligned. The potential causes are considered; covering a wide-range of issues. The consequences of this non-alignment are also examined to allow discussion on whether transport and land-use planning alignment is always necessary or advisable.

In considering "process", the paper focuses on the methods of transport analysis that can be used to integrate transport and land use planning. This examines issues of policy definition, recognition of conflicting issues, methods of resolution and considers how a hierarchical approach can provide integration vertically and horizontally across different disciplines, organisations and sectors.

Looking at delivery, the paper considers the evolution of the new guidance and what practical processes are needed. It draws on practice using examples, such as the innovative approach developed to consider the strategic transport upgrades (infrastructure and services) that will be needed to support the delivery of the Ayrshire Joint Structure Plan.


Summary:
The Scottish Government has recognised the need to integrate the transport appraisal process more actively within the Development Planning process, and will soon be issuing guidance to assist policy makers and practitioners alike.

While Governmental, legal and other process will differ across Europe, this paper will focus on three levels of activity that have common application:

- alignment of plans and policies;
- development of analytical process; and
- delivering the successful outcome.

Publisher

Association for European Transport