Turning Data into Information for Transport Decision Making



Turning Data into Information for Transport Decision Making

Authors

A Vandervalk, Cambridge Systematics, Inc., US

Description

The paper explores several examples of successful transportation planning and operations data integration practice using a variety of tools and methods from around the US and Canada.

Abstract

Transportation policy makers, planners and operators around the world are faced with declining budgets along with demanding customers expecting smoothly operating multimodal systems supported by real-time traveler information at all times. There continues to be an ever growing source of data and information regarding travel times, travel speeds, modal options, weather, incidents and asset conditions to support planning, modeling and operations of systems. However, high-level decision makers responsible for funding and project decisions do not always have the tools and resources they need to make optimal use of all the new data available to them. This paper explores the following topics:
• External forces and factors influencing transportation system performance and data sources, such as energy, climate change, finance, and demographics
• New paradigms for data acquisition
• Integration/fusing/visualization tools to maximize the use of data for decision making
• Policy challenges related to the role of private sector data related to freight and passenger movement
• Technical challenges such as location referencing, ownership/cost of data or ensuring integrated data is relevant and useful
• Data governance techniques to ensure data can be shared and integrated
• Opportunities to enhance data programs through technologies and collaborations
• Using tools and methods to prioritize and make policy trade-offs
The paper explores several examples of successful transportation planning and operations data integration practice using a variety of tools and methods from around the United States and Canada. Some projects that will be discussed include:
• United States Federal Highway Administration Data Governance Project
• Transport Canada Connected Vehicles Initiative
• Colorado Department of Transportation – Aligning Data for Decision Making
• Florida Department of Transportation – White Paper overviews ten existing travel time and origin/destination data collection technologies available in the market today, assesses their uses, and addresses advantages and disadvantages of each. The technologies evaluated include: Probe Measure Technologies (Toll tag, Bluetooth, Cellular phone, Crowd-sourcing, Private Data Providers), Video Image Detection, Radar, In-pavement loops, Magnetic detectors)
In summary this paper will present challenges, best case examples and provide ideas for the future of institutional and technical tools and processes to optimize transportation systems.
European transport agencies will benefit from this paper in the following ways:
• Gain insight into methods and ideas for integrating, collecting and harmonizing data from the 27 member states
• Learn new approaches that could help collect better data more cheaply
• Promote discussion regarding sharing resources and research between Europe and North America to advance the state of the practice in turning data into information

Publisher

Association for European Transport