The Assessment of the Suitability of Waste Materials of the Use in Highway Construction



The Assessment of the Suitability of Waste Materials of the Use in Highway Construction

Authors

WOODSIDE A, WOODWARD W and FARMER D, University of Ulster and COLLINS R, Building Research Establishment, UK

Description

For the past number of years there has been an increasing awareness for the need to conserve and protect natural resources and recycle or reclaim those materials which are in short or finite supply. It is generally agreed that the conservation of existing

Abstract

For the past number of years there has been an increasing awareness for the need to conserve and protect natural resources and recycle or reclaim those materials which are in short or finite supply. It is generally agreed that the conservation of existing sources of construction materials is an overriding priority for present and future generations. In contrast, one third of the demolition finns surveyed by the Institute of Demolition Engineers in the Lindsell Report 1990 (1) expected the amount of demolition debris to increase by 50% to 100% by the end of the decade. This will lead to an increase in the cost of dumping at landfill sites particularly in the SE of England where contractors may fred it more expensive to dump demolition material rather than recycle it, especially with the proposed introduction of the new Landfill Tax on the 1 st October 1996. In this tax a surcharge of£2 per tonne of material to be dumped is added to the dumping cost.

Research by the Institute of Demolition Engineers has estimated that the amount of demolition debris produced annually in the UK to be in the region of 25 million tonnes Given the correct conditions and efficient recycling, this could lead to a reduction in the demand of naturally occurring aggregates by as much as 10%. At present only 5% of the total construction and demolition waste is recycled totalling 1.2 million tonnes per annum. However, according to Ferguson (2) this is expected to rise to 4 million tonnes by the year 2011.

As yet little use is made of this material in the UK for recycling back into permanent road works. This lack of acceptance of recycled aggregates for use in Highway Construction is primarily due to the lack of British Standards specifying the use of recycled aggregates. In view of the increasing pressures on the supplies of natural aggregates and the decreasing availability of landfill sites, recycled materials may be used to help remedy the situation as quickly as possible.

Publisher

Association for European Transport