The Behavioural Impacts of a Rewarding Scheme During Two and a Half Years



The Behavioural Impacts of a Rewarding Scheme During Two and a Half Years

Authors

H Palm, Goudappel Coffeng BV; A Kooistra, BNV Mobility; P van Noort, De Verkeersonderneming, NL

Description

In the region Rotterdam 2,000 car drivers were stimulating not to make their peak trips in return for a monetary reward and information services. In the paper we describe the travel behaviour changes during the total lifetime of the project.

Abstract

The motorway A15 connects the Rotterdam harbour with the hinterland and therefore is of important economic interest. In 2011 construction works have started to widen the A15. Next to these construction works several other measures are implemented to keep the harbour accessible. One of the mobility demand management measures is trying to stimulate car drivers, who are frequently using the A15, not to make their peak trips in return for a monetary reward and new information services.

The peak avoidance project in Rotterdam started at October 26th 2009 and will finish July 1st 2012. The project is unique in several aspects, namely the long period of 2,5 years and a predefined performance of the contractors was required. It is not, as with other projects, a number of participants but the fee for the contractors is based on the actual result on the road. The project is coming to an end, and therefore the learning experiences can be distinguished and recommendations for the future can be made.

A monitor system was used to measure the travel behaviour of each individual participant. Therefore different types of data are collected: daily intentions sent by smartphone, GPS tracks, camera detections and web-based surveys about their home to work travel routines and socio demographic characteristics. Earlier publications gave the results from the first half year. In this paper we describe the travel behaviour changes during the total lifetime of the project.

Approximately 2,000 commuters have participated in the project. Within this group the number of trips in the peak hours reduced by 58%, this is approximately 300,.000 trips in the last two years. Mostly they changed their departure time or to a lesser extent, took another route or mode. Most of the participants used one alternative. These alternatives were generally not used before the project. Therefore the project contributes to more awareness of alternatives.

There are many participants who have joined from the beginning. After two years 68% of them are still participant. They are enthusiastic about their new way of travel. Furthermore we have distinguished good from bad performers by some characteristics. For example, good performers drive less car kilometers and are less highly educated.

In order to encourage participants to choose an alternative for the car in the peak period, six value-added-services were developed, such as car pool matching and short term travel time forecasts. However, we saw a limited use of the services. Research through surveys pointed out a low interest in travelling together and travel times for commuter trips.

Actual traffic counts at the A15 support the travel behaviour changes of the participants. In average 800 less peak trips per day were made by the participants. Before the project was started 10,500 vehicles passed the A15 in one direction. So the project reduced the flow by 7%. Due to new traffic the reduction ended up with 2%.

The peak avoidance project will run for a total of two and a half years. This means that the possibility of receiving a reward for their behaviour will expire. An important question is whether the participants go back to their old travel patterns or keep the new way of travel. Although the project is still ongoing, speculations can already be given.

Publisher

Association for European Transport