The Importance of Scotland's Casualty Record in National Road Safety Planning



The Importance of Scotland's Casualty Record in National Road Safety Planning

Authors

HALDEN D and HARLAND D, Transport Research Laboratory, UK

Description

The success of road safety initiatives in Scotland depends upon the effective targeting of limited resources and involves the co-operation and support of a wide range of agencies. Road safety planning needs to identify the character of the casualty proble

Abstract

The success of road safety initiatives in Scotland depends upon the effective targeting of limited resources and involves the co-operation and support of a wide range of agencies. Road safety planning needs to identify the character of the casualty problem, examine the potential for improvements, and define achievable and measurable goals to obtain the necessary changes. Good practice in road safety planning ~ includes the development of a plan to co-ordinate road safety policies and programmes and set out clearly defined actions for a commitment of known and available resources.

At a national level, central government in Scotland must provide a framework for all kinds of activities which is effective and flexible. The most significant road safety inifmtive of this type in recent years has been the setting of a target to reduce casualties by one third by the year 2000 from the 1981 to 1985 average. However there are also many detailed activities which need to be managed and controlled, so in 1995 The Scottish Office published a road safety plan defining these.

This plan was based upon research by TRL synthesising current knowledge of road safety activities in the context of the accident problem in Scotland, together with the plans of the managers and other officials who are within the locus of The Scottish Office and who can influence road safety.

In order to establish achievable targets which were focused at the casualty problem, the plan was developed by:

* identifying the scale and character of the casualty problem in Scotland, and

* establishing the feasibility and effectiveness of casualty reduction approaches

Publisher

Association for European Transport