The Complexity of Travel: Trip Chaining in Norway



The Complexity of Travel: Trip Chaining in Norway

Authors

L Vaagane, Institute of Transport Economics, NO

Description

The number of trips and trip chains are indicators of the complexity of a person’s travel pattern. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the complexity varies in the population, and identify factors that contribute to a complex travel pattern.

Abstract

During a day a Norwegian aged 13 years and older who travels performs on average 3.8 trips. These trips are not isolated events, and most of them are linked into chains. The combination of localisation and timing of activities and availability of transport defines a person’s travel patterns. The number of trips and the number of chains are indicators of the complexity of the travel pattern. The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent trip chaining takes place, and how it varies by different subgroups of the population.

Three issues are examined in this paper. First, how does family life affect trip making and trip chaining? We divide the population into subgroups based on gender and whether they have children and/or a partner. Second, what should be defined as a complex travel pattern; and third, what factors contribute to a complex travel pattern?

Trip chains are in this setting home based. The complexity of the travel pattern is measured by number of trip chains, number of trips and number of trips per chain. In order to identify which factors contribute to complex travel patterns, the subgroups are separately fitted into regression models that includes, among other factors, age, day of week and access to car.

Preliminary results suggest that women have the shortest trip chains, but have more trips per chain than men, even if they do not have children.

This paper uses data from the Norwegian National Travel Survey 2009. 28 900 people from 13 years upward have been interviewed about their transport resources and their travel activities. Interviews were carried out throughout the whole year to avoid seasonal variations in travel behaviour. The data set contains nearly 94 000 trips carried out the day before the interview took place.

Publisher

Association for European Transport