Designing Stated Adaptation Experiments for Changes to Activity-travel Repertoires: Approach in the Context of Pricing Policies



Designing Stated Adaptation Experiments for Changes to Activity-travel Repertoires: Approach in the Context of Pricing Policies

Authors

E Khademi, T Arentze, H Timmermans, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL

Description

This paper presents the initial results of an innovative interactive internet-based stated adaptation survey based on the concept of a repertoire, for analyzing travelers’ response to different pricing schemes

Abstract

Stated preference (SP) experiments have become a well-established approach of data collection in travel choice behaviour to model behavioral change to exogenous policies, especially when the policy make induce dramatic change and/or historical data of the behavior under investigation are missing. While SP experiments have dominated the field in transportation research, the fact that the focus of interest concern behavioral change has instigated the use of stated adaptation (SA) experiments more recently. However, compared to stated preference and choice experiments, much less is known about stated adaptation experiments. Prior research has primarily examined adaptation in relation to a single facet of travel behavior. This may be unrealistic for those cases where policy implementation may trigger multi-faceted changes to activity-travel behavior.

This paper focuses on the description of an innovative new SA survey for analyzing travelers' response to different pricing schemes. A frequently used approach in most similar studies consists of a two-stage methodology. In the first stage, households are asked to report their current behaviour for a certain period of time, and based on that the choice experiments are then constructed. In this research, the activity-based approach is used and an interactive internet-based survey is designed which is different from previous studies in two respects. Firstly, the design is not based on a certain period of time (day and week), but on habitual behaviour and the concept of a repertoire or script. Secondly, it focuses on the complete rescheduling of a reported script in response to pricing policies rather than offering a discrete set of adaptation strategies. Experiences and the initial results based on this approach will be presented.

Keywords: Stated Adaptation Experiment, Activity-Based Approach, Activity Repertoire

Publisher

Association for European Transport