Mitigation of Rear-end Accident Problems at Signalised Intersections



Mitigation of Rear-end Accident Problems at Signalised Intersections

Authors

DATTA T, AL-ASSAR R, ABRAHAM J and NANNAPANENI P, Wayne State University, USA

Description

Rear end accidents at signalized intersections are often considered a normal occurrence in the USA. Some researchers even accept such results thinking that the installation of traffic signals reduce more severe accidents such as right angle and left turn

Abstract

Rear end accidents at signalized intersections are often considered a normal occurrence in the USA. Some researchers even accept such results thinking that the installation of traffic signals reduce more severe accidents such as right angle and left turn head on accidents, however, it increases rear-end accidents. Traffic and Safety Engineers have accepted this almost as inevitable.

Rear-end accidents occur when a lead vehicle in a traffic stream suddenly stops or reduces the speed, and the following vehicle(s) could not stop or did not stop in time. This phenomenon happens when the following vehicles have restricted view of the roadway and environment upstream. The abundance of sport utility vehicles in the traffic stream further aggravate the sight restriction problems if the following vehicle is a passenger car.

The sudden stopping or slowing down of the lead vehicle(s) occur due to variety of reasons including:

* Vehicles cutting in front without prior indication or warning, forcing the lead vehicle to use hard braking to avoid a collision.

* Sudden change of amber signal to red signal at a signalized intersection when the lead vehicle was planning to go through.

* Vehicles from driveways near the intersection suddenly turn right or left, thus violating the expectation of the lead vehicle driver. All of these situations occur in abundance at or near signalized intersections.

The authors conducted a citywide analysis of three years, 1988, 1989, and 1990, traffic accident data for 103 signalized intersections in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Grand Rapids is a city of over 300,000 in population and is the second largest city in the state of Michigan. The study also included reviewing roadway geometry and other features of the intersections.

Particular attention was given to the intersections with a high density of driveways at the approaches and at the far sides of the intersections.

The basic purpose of this research was to identify casual factors related to rear-end accidents and develop mitigation strategies.

Publisher

Association for European Transport