A COMPARISON OF MOBILITY BEHAVIOUR BETWEEN THE AGGLOMERATIONS OF VIENNA (AT) AND BRATISLAVA (SK)



A COMPARISON OF MOBILITY BEHAVIOUR BETWEEN THE AGGLOMERATIONS OF VIENNA (AT) AND BRATISLAVA (SK)

Authors

Roman Klementschitz, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Peter-Jordan-Str. 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria, Oliver Roider, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (

Description

The paper presents analyses of the relation of cohesion, land use changes; infrastructure supply and mobility demand based on an identical mobility survey which was launched in the neighbouring agglomerations of Vienna and Bratislava in 2013/2014.

Abstract

Bratislava agglomeration with its 1.2 Mio inhabitants in total and Vienna agglomeration with its 2.5 Mio inhabitants in total are the only capitals in Europe, which are located within daily commuting distance (centre to centre 65 km travel distance). However, because of the historical background as well as the differences in language and culture, transport demand markets developed independently from each other most of the second half of the 20th century. Since the countries became members of the European Union (AT in 1995 and SK in 2004) and the Schengen Agreement at the AT-SK border came into effect in the year 2007, the cohesion of these regions has strongly developed. As collecting information on mobility behaviour is underdeveloped in Slovakia and outdated in Austria, both ministries of transport decided to launch a common mobility survey using the same data collection methodology and survey content in order to receive a totally comparable set of mobility data for the survey area. The survey includes all week days and transport modes including non-motorised modes. Besides, a section of the survey asks for attributes of the household members such as (1) access to mobility (e.g. public transport stops, car and bicycle availability), (2) duty to assist other persons for satisfying their mobility needs (e.g. disabled, children, elderly) and (3) socio demographic variables (e.g. profession, education, working time). The survey was launched in autumn 2013 and will be finished in spring 2014. In total a net sample of 17000 interviews is planned on either side in the capital city and the districts along the Austrian-Slovakian border. The project is co-financed by the European Development Fund, Cross-Border Cooperation; Slovakia - Austria 2007-2013 project EFRE. This data set allows (1) to compare the actual situation in the regions concerned, (2) to understand the extent of regional integration between the two countries, (3) to analyse the environmental effects of the mobility and (4) to deduce to which extent the mobility demand is influenced by the existing infrastructure supply between and within the regions. Additionally, a transnational transport model based on the data gained from the survey will be established for the whole region, which for the first time allows analysing the traffic flows within the area considering trip purposes such as work, education, leisure, shopping and others.
The paper and presentation will give an overview on the results and will also highlight developments in the mobility demand in comparison to the last surveys carried out in (parts of) the region. Conclusions will be made how the provided infrastructure supply in the area will influence the mobility behaviour (e.g. mode choice dependent on the public transport supply within and between the regions) and if there is a need to change the existing situation in the light of the emission targets envisaged by the European Union.

Publisher

Association for European Transport