Strategies for Urban Traffic Management and Control



Strategies for Urban Traffic Management and Control

Authors

WOOD K, Transport Research Laboratory, UK

Description

For many years Urban Traffic Control systems have helped traffic move efficiently in urban areas. In the UK, the optimisation criterion for UTC systems has been an economic optimum expressed as minimum delay. Under modem conditions it is becoming increasi

Abstract

For many years Urban Traffic Control systems have helped traffic move efficiently in urban areas. In the UK, the optimisation criterion for UTC systems has been an economic optimum expressed as minimum delay. Under modem conditions it is becoming increasingly important to manage traffic, rather than optimise the control of traffic signals to meet the demands of all traffic. A new specification is needed to meet this need and to take advantage of advances in computer and communications systems. Therefore, the UK Department of Transport is proceeding, in cooperation with the Traffic Director for London, with a group of research projects aimed at developing an open, fimctional specification for Urban Traffic Management and Control (UTMC) systems, (Maclerman et al, 1996). Within this group of projects, the Department of Transport has contracted TRL to examine the Feasibility of Strategy Selection. This paper concentrates on the potential use of traffic management strategies and conflicts between them. It is concerned with the effects of the choice of, and interactions between, different possible strategies in terms of their effects on the traffic using the road network and, ultimately, on all potential travellers. The computing and communications compatibilities between different UTMC components are the responsibility of other contractors within the UTMC development projects. These projects and their results are the subjects of the earlier papers in this session.

Strategies are basically tools to help implement local policies. Therefore, to understand what strategies might be needed in the future, it is necessary to examine the potential policies that traffic managers may be called on to achieve. Having used potential policies to determine a set of strategies, the paper then describes the analysis of the potential traffic conflicts between the strategies and the proposed methods of resolving the conflicts. Followed by a section on likely policies and the strategies that would be used for them.

Publisher

Association for European Transport