Application of an Activity-based Demand Model in the UK



Application of an Activity-based Demand Model in the UK

Authors

Siamak Khorgami, AECOM, Peter Jones, University College London, Helena Titheridge, University College London

Description

Application of an activity-based demand model in the UK is discussed. This is followed by illustrating the resulting changes in travel behaviour from introducing some transport soft policies.

Abstract

Activity based travel analysis has received much attention in the academic literature and has seen several practical applications in recent decades. Operational models have been developed and are being used in North America and some mainland European cities for policy analysis; although in the UK the practical application of activity-based modelling is much more limited, despite the fact that available sources of travel and activity data enable such models to be developed.

However, closer examination shows that most operational models do not fully embody the principles of an activity-based approach. In particular, (i) the models mainly concentrate on out-of-home activities, (ii) they assume that only one activity takes place at each non-home location, and (iii) the basic unit of analysis in these models is the trip tour or the activity pattern, rather than using individual activities as the basic building blocks.

This paper first outlines the overall framework of a developed model which outputs daily activity/travel patterns, using individual daily activities as the starting point. The model has two major sequential components: (1) an activity generation and household allocation model system, followed by (2) an activity/travel scheduling model system. The paper then discusses and presents a result of a simplified destination choice, travel tour and trip generation model developed for one of the Leicestershire towns in the UK. This will be followed by illustrating the resulting changes in travel behaviour from introducing policies such as:

a) Encouraging activity densification and mixed land uses;
b) Changes in working activity hours; and
c) Changes in opening hours of activities.

Finally, the trade-offs between in-home and out-of-home activities and Intra-household interactions will be discussed.

Publisher

Association for European Transport