The Effects of Feeder Accessibility on HSR’s Share: Case of Wuhan-Guangzhou Corridor of China



The Effects of Feeder Accessibility on HSR’s Share: Case of Wuhan-Guangzhou Corridor of China

Authors

Shengchuan Zhao, Dalian University of Technology, Bingrong Sun, Dalian University of Technology

Description

This paper studies the effects of feeder accessibility on HSR’s share, with a case of Wuhan-Guangzhou Corridor in China.

Abstract

Since the late 1970s, China has enjoyed one of the most remarkable periods of economic growth ever seen. Meanwhile, China has also been experiencing dynamic urbanization and motorization. From 1980-2010: the overall GDP increased approximately 88 times, averaging around 10% growth per annum; the urban population tripled while the total population increased 40%; the per Capita GDP increased approximately 65 times; the number of motor vehicles and motor vehicle drivers also increased approximately 44 times and 62 times respectively.

China’s rapid economic growth, large-scale urbanization and dynamic motorization have created a mass demand for intercity transportation. The huge demands have been major challenges for the intercity transportation system in China. China has been seeking a comprehensive transportation system including private cars, buses, railway (including high speed railway), waterway and airplanes. Among them, High Speed Railway (HSR) has been developed at an amazing speed in recent years. However, the poor feeder accessibility to/from HSR station has restricted the increase of modal share by HSR.

This paper studies the effects of feeder accessibility on HSR’s share, with a case of Wuhan-Guangzhou Corridor in China. The paper begins with an introduction of recent developments of transportation infrastructures and then demonstrates the changes of passenger transportation flows as a result of dynamic development of transportation infrastructures. It is found that the overall demands for all modes have increased approximately 10 times by passenger number and approximately 12 times by passenger-km from 1980-2010. The shares by passenger-km increased from 32.0% in 1980 to 53.9% in 2010 by road and from 1.7% in 1980 to 14.5% in 2010 by air; while railway has lost almost half of its market share since 1980. It is of interest to find that the average trip length has remained approximately 500 km by railway and approximately 1,500 km by air transportation since 2005. This implies each mode may have its own market segmentation for a certain travel distance. To keep the market share each mode should continuously provide good services. In order to test the effects of better feeder accessibility from/to the HSR station, the route of Wuhan-Guangzhou corridor owning HSR, conventional railway and air transportation is selected and the modal choice models were estimated based on the Stated Preference survey data collected from this transportation corridor in 2011. 10 assumed policy scenarios including speed-up, price discounts and better feeder accessibility of HSR were tested based on the estimated models. It was found that price discount and speed-up policies received little effects; however, providing better feeder accessibility including the reduction of transfer time within the HSR station was most effective policy. The paper finally suggests that the TOD approach should be introduced to develop the HSR stations and their surrounding areas to ensure the success of HSR in China.

Publisher

Association for European Transport