Assessing Accessibility and Mobility of Urban Regions in an Integrated Way



Assessing Accessibility and Mobility of Urban Regions in an Integrated Way

Authors

Karel Martens, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, Jeroen Bastiaanssen, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

Description

In this paper, I present a novel framework for transportation planning, which is based on a simultaneous assessment of the accessibility provided by a transport-land use system and the potential mobility provided by the transport system.

Abstract

In this paper, I present a framework to simultaneously assess the accessibility provided by a transport-land use system and the potential mobility provided by the transport system. I start from the vast literature proposing accessibility as the key indicator to assess the performance of transport and land use systems. I then proceed to point out that the advantage of accessibility as an indicator – its ability to capture the combined effect of transport and land use – is also its drawback. By integrating both aspects, accessibility indicators do not to allow transportation or urban planners to identify why accessibility levels are low or high in a particular area. More precisely, accessibility indicators leave underdetermined where transport systems respectively urban planning have succeeded in providing high levels of service, and where either or both have failed to do so. Because of this, accessibility indicators do not provide a guide for action, as they leave undetermined (a) the way in which a particular situation could be improved; and (b) the (governmental) organization that should take prime responsibility for improving that situation.
In paper, I present a new framework to unravel the spatial and infrastructure component of accessibility, termed the POMA-framework. This framework provides a novel approach to identify β€˜the’ transport problems in metropolitan and rural areas alike. It thus provides a framework that could serve as the basis for transportation planning and urban planning. In contrast to traditional approaches to transportation planning, it does not focus on the quality of the transportation network as such, but on the ultimate goal of a transport network: to enable people to participate in out-of-home activities. In contrast to the vast body of literature on accessibility measures, it provides a clear framework to determine when an intervention in the transport network is called for and when such an intervention is unlikely to deliver results.
The framework is applied to analyze accessibility patterns in several regions in the Netherlands, among which Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The analysis results in the identification of priorities for transportation and land use policies in the regions of study.

Publisher

Association for European Transport