Measurability the Liveability of Cities – More Than One Indicator?



Measurability the Liveability of Cities – More Than One Indicator?

Authors

Jense Fontyn, Policy Research Centre on Commodity and Passenger flows (MOBILO)- University of Antwerp, Thierry Vanelslander, Policy Research Centre on Commodity and Passenger flows (MOBILO)- University of Antwerp, Roel Gevaers, Policy Research Centre on

Description

This paper reports on how to measure the liveability within cities. The objective of this paper is to determine the urban freight indicators needed when measuring the liveability of cities, where possible illustrated by case studies.

Abstract

As a junction of different economic activities, cities need a lot of goods and services on a daily basis. There is a clear relation between the economic growth and transport towards and within the cities. As economic growth will lead to more economic activities, this lies at the heart of an increased demand for transport. In turn, this increase of both passenger and freight transport will have an impact on the liveability within the cities.
The traffic congestion, air quality, safety, transport-related emissions, etc. are just a number of elements people are faced with due to the increased goods and passenger flows. When cities are able to manage the logistics in cities in an effective and efficient way, the liveability and the quality of life within these cities will only further improve.
Therefore, this paper reports on how to measure the liveability within cities and addresses several topics. More specifically, the objective of this paper is to determine the urban freight indicators needed when measuring the liveability of cities, where possible illustrated by case studies. This study builds on research commissioned by the Flemish government and will investigate not only on a Flemish level but also at an European level different case studies.
Initially, it is important to have a good understanding and clear definition on “liveability”. Several sources are compared to have a better view on this term and to formulize an own definition from which further investigation will start.
Secondly, this paper focuses on the measurability of liveability. Which indicators are currently taken into account when measuring liveability? Which indicators need to be incorporated if we want to look at a logistics aspect?
The used method is literature review and an analysis of different case studies of Europe. By analyzing the different case studies on the applied parameters, an overview can be made of the logistics aspect. To get a better understanding of the missing logistics indicators, first, an overview is made of different case studies and which parameters they have taken into account. To identify the missing indicators the study examines the effect of logistics flows on cities.
The analysis shows that only a limited amount of data on urban freight distribution is used when measuring liveability in cities. Therefore this paper examines how this aspect could be dealt with and investigates the missing logistic indicators when measuring the liveability within cities. Based on the evolution of these logistic indicators policymakers will be able to develop the appropriate actions at the right moment.

Publisher

Association for European Transport