Urban Multimodal Travel Behaviour: Towards Mobility Without a Private Car



Urban Multimodal Travel Behaviour: Towards Mobility Without a Private Car

Authors

Oliver Schwedes, Technische Universität Berlin, Veronique Riedel, Technische Universität Berlin

Description

The paper provides empirical data on the motivations and organization of multimodal transport use of urban car owners. Further it provides an example of classification with respect to their willingness to reduce car use or abolish the private car.

Abstract

Multimodal travel behavior has been growing for the last decades in densely populated urban areas. With its implications for a more sustainable travel behavior it has come to the fore in the area of transport and mobility research recently. While the quantitative aspects of multimodal travel behavior has been shown in some studies for Germany, material for a comprehensive analysis about peoples’ motives for multimodal travel is scarcely available.
This paper provides empirical data gathered in the research project city2.e on the motivations and organization of multimodal transport use of urban car owners. Further it provides an example for their classification with respect to their willingness to reduce car use or (even) abolish the private car. The results from this study demonstrate the heterogeneity of ‘urban multimodals’ with a different openness towards alternatives to the car.
In context of city2.e, multimodal travel behavior was analyzed based on a qualitative study with citizens of Prenzlauer Berg, a highly dense inner-city part of Berlin. The sample comprises people with a private car and a contrast group of people in households without one. This allows for recommendations concerning a user-oriented approach to reorganize the use of the car in the inner city in favor of public transport modes, cycling and forms of car sharing.
Different groups of multimodal car owners were identified. They need specifically targeted measures to support the use of alternative transport modes. For instance, one of the groups identified are ‘multimodals with a particular preference for the car’. This group mainly uses the car for irregular transports, (family) trips and holidays. The research shows that their idea of an acceptable mobility is strongly dependent on the motive of flexibility and accessibility that they only attribute to their car. This holds true even if they have positive experiences with the use of transport alternatives in other contexts of their everyday life. Consequently, they would need information and incentives to test flexible car rental or sharing schemes which replace the private car in other contexts of use. Additionally, those schemes should be part of integrated concepts, e.g. including public transport tickets or rental car offers with extra kilometers allowing an easy organization of trips outside the city. To support a multimodal travel behavior with an emphasis on transport mode alternatives, the results suggest supplement specific restrictions that hamper the conditions of use of an own car.

Publisher

Association for European Transport