Legal or Illegal Cabotage? How Big Data Can Help to Solve This Question!



Legal or Illegal Cabotage? How Big Data Can Help to Solve This Question!

Authors

Aad Van Den Engel, Panteia, Jan Francke, Netherlands Institute for Transport Policy Analysis (KiM),, Arnaud Burgess, Panteia

Description

The paper is based on a literature review, and analysis of regular statistical sources and of big data gathered with specific equipment along the motorways in the Netherlands.

Abstract

The European Commission (EC) proposed in 2011, in the White Paper ‘Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area – Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system’, to further liberalise cabotage in the road freight sector in the European Union. In 2012 a High Level Group prepared a thorough report on the Development of the EU Road Haulage Market (EC, 2012).

During 2013 the EC proposal for lifting the remaining restrictions on the cabotage rules was postponed due to the fact that several member states wanted to have a better insight into the amount of legal and illegal cabotage and related problems related to drivers’ welfare and so called ‘social dumping’. According to a study for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment Europe still lacks a level playing field of the road haulage sector due to both different interpretations in cabotage and related regulation as well as differences in monitoring and enforcement. This can already be observed under current regulation and is expected to increase even further if regulation is untightened (PRC, 2013).

Cabotage, meaning the national carriage of goods for hire or reward carried out by non resident hauliers on a temporary basis in a host Member State, is governed by Regulation (EC) 1072/2009 as of 14 May 2010. This regulation replaced Regulations (EEC) No 881/92 and (EEC) No 3118/93, as well as Directive 2006/94/EC. The aim of the new Regulations was to improve the efficiency of road freight transport by reducing empty trips after the unloading of international transport operations.
Article 8 of the Regulation provides that every haulier is entitled to perform up to three cabotage operations within a seven day period starting the day after the unloading of the international transport.

Eurostat publishes official statistics on the volume of cabotage performed in the various member states specified by the nationality of the road freight transport company. The statistical reliability of these figures however is not very high. Some stakeholders even express the view that the actual volume of cabotage is much higher (2 or 3 times) than these official statistics due to illegal cabotage.

The Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment commissioned Panteia to find an approach for monitoring cabotage to support more consistent and effective enforcements of the cabotage rules. Panteia used their experience in developing the TRX TransportIndex.nl from big traffic data sources in a pilot for estimating the amount of legal and illegal cabotage in the Netherlands (Panteia, 2014).

The paper is based on a literature review, and analysis of regular statistical sources and of big data gathered with specific equipment along the motorways in the Netherlands.

Publisher

Association for European Transport