Promising Mobility Friendly Urbanization Strategies: Time for a Paradigm Shift?



Promising Mobility Friendly Urbanization Strategies: Time for a Paradigm Shift?

Authors

VERROEN E J and HILBERS H D, TNO Institute for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, The Netherlands

Description

The spatial planning of activities such as housing, working, facilities and recreation could certainly make a valuable contribution to the realization of transportation policy objectives. 'Proximity' and 'building near stations' are key principles of curr

Abstract

The spatial planning of activities such as housing, working, facilities and recreation could certainly make a valuable contribution to the realization of transportation policy objectives. 'Proximity' and 'building near stations' are key principles of current policies in the Netherlands. However, recent developments call for the reconsideration of some of the long- term planning principles. It appears that 'good' locations with high proximity are scarce, they sometimes require large investments to open them up to public transport, and they are not always geared to the daily activity patterns of urban inhabitants, who are increasingly spread over a number of urban areas.

For this reason, TNO-INRO carried out a number of studies for the Ministries of Transport and of Housing and Planning into potentially successful urbanization options for the longer term and their transportation consequences. It was concluded that mixed and (to a lesser extent) clustered urbanization, as close as possible to, or between, existing urban districts and with good connections to high-quality public transport has the most favourable effect on mobility. However, single-core locations, with a certain proximity to only one urban centre, are not always preferable. Especially in the highly urbanized, multi-nodal Randstad region it is recommended to switch to multi-core locations on the axes between the cities, preferably in the form of self-supporting new towns. Either way, the current paradigm of single-core urban patterns (Compact Cities) calls for some reconsideration.

Publisher

Association for European Transport