Transport Planning for the 2014 Commonwealth Games and Ryder Cup – a Partnership Approach



Transport Planning for the 2014 Commonwealth Games and Ryder Cup – a Partnership Approach

Authors

Hugh Gillies, Transport Scotland

Description

This paper will cover how Transport Scotland worked with major sporting event organisers and key stakeholders both at the transport planning and the operational delivery stages in the lead up to and during 2014.

Abstract

A crowded calendar of events in Scotland during 2014 meant it was going to be an unprecedented year in terms of extraordinary demands on the country’s transport infrastructure and services.

The main focal point was the summer autumn period when the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games (an international multi sports event over 11 days, with 6500 competitors and officials from 71 countries and territories, with ticket sales in excess of one million) and the Ryder Cup at Gleneagles (Golf’s premier international team event), were held within weeks of each other. For a small country like Scotland, with a population of under 6 million this meant we would be at the centre of the sporting world with a global TV audience reaching hundreds of millions of people.

This paper will cover how the Scottish Government’s national transport agency, Transport Scotland worked with major sporting event organisers and key stakeholders both at the transport planning and the operational delivery stages in the lead up to and during 2014. Part of the paper will describe how lessons learned from the London 2012 Olympics were applied to the 2014 Scottish major events transport solutions.

Commonwealth Games
A strong partnership approach was at the heart of transport planning and operational delivery. Transport Scotland played its part working alongside Glasgow 2014, Glasgow City Council, SPT, First ScotRail, Network Rail and others to help ensure priorities for the Games, the city of Glasgow and the rest of Scotland were delivered collectively.

As part of the transport governance structure, a Transport Programme Board (TPB) was established at the start of 2014 to coordinate the transition of planning to operation of the Games transport solution. It was co-chaired by Glasgow City Council and Transport Scotland. The TPB provided strategic guidance and assisted in decision making relating to transport across all partners.

Transport Scotland delivered all major transport infrastructure projects listed as Games commitments including heavy rail and motorway links as well as rail station upgrades. These projects will leave a lasting legacy of reduced journey times plus new and enhanced sustainable public transport, for the benefit of the whole of Scotland.

The success of the transport plans was underpinned through various means including the delivery of the biggest train timetable that Scotland has ever seen, strengthened Glasgow subway services, Park and Ride, venue shuttle buses and the provision of a Games Route Network (GRN).

Transport Scotland liaised with a wide range of transport providers to ensure that long distance journeys to and from the Games venues operated with maximum capacity and were delivered smoothly. Such stakeholders included Scotland’s airports, Scotland / England cross-border rail operators and our neighbours at England’s Highways Agency.

Our Trunk Road recorded volumes only raised by 7% at Games time. This has to be seen as a positive as travellers were asked as to consider using public transport or alternative road journeys during Games time.

In particular, a Travel Demand Management (TDM) programme was put in place to positively influence travel behaviour, including that of local residents, business and spectators. This approach was used at London 2012.

The way people used public transport was one of the successes of these games. By using public transport, cycling and walking, spectators and visitors helped keep the city and country moving. Scotland’s public transport systems moved record numbers of people and business as usual transport needs were met.

Ryder Cup
For the Ryder Cup, Transport Scotland again had an oversight role for keeping Scotland moving, ensuring competitors and spectators arrived at the event on time whilst minimising the effect on every-day travellers. The transport system contributed to the success of The 2014 Ryder Cup and has been hailed by the golf organisers as the “best transport provision ever”.

A Transport Plan was developed by all Partners to maximise the use of the available road network, public transport, including trains, buses and coaches and to minimise travel impact on communities and the travelling public. Details of the plan were communicated to local communities through a series of engagement events.

The Ryder Cup was a non-car event with spectators being encouraged to travel to and from the event using rail services to Gleneagles rail station and the Park & Ride sites at Balado, Stirling and Perth. The sites were strategically located, so as to reduce pressure on the trunk road network, enhance road safety and ensure people could both travel to the event and go about their normal business with least possible disruption.

Publisher

Association for European Transport