Commercial Areas Achieving the Zero Emission Goal Using the Potentials of Electric Mobility: The ECar-Park Sindelfingen



Commercial Areas Achieving the Zero Emission Goal Using the Potentials of Electric Mobility: The ECar-Park Sindelfingen

Nominated for The Planning for Sustainable Land Use and Transport Award

Authors

Manfred Schmid, Institute of Urban Planning and Design, University of Stuttgart, Wofgang Rid, Institute of Urban Planning and Design, University of Stuttgart

Description

Trade-offs between electric mobility and renewable energies are used to develop a zero emission commercial park in terms of electricity, heat and mobility. Companies are enabled to avoid environmental impacts beyond their area of direct influence.

Abstract

Industrial and commercial companies of most branches have increased their efforts to achieve ecological compliant goods and services. However, transport and electricity requirements often lead to fixed emissions beyond a company's area of direct influence. While several zero/low emission commercial areas have been developed so far, the concepts often suffer from high investment costs, low transferability and a still fossil-based mobility.
The eCar-Park Sindelfingen aims at delivering carbon neutral heat, electricity and mobility to its siting companies. To reach this aim, trade-offs between electric mobility and renewable energies are identified and used: Electricity oversupplies will be buffered in battery electric vehicles (BEV) and fed back in times of undersupplies. If managed appropriately, the concept requires less installed capacities of renewable energies, which leads to decreased investment costs.
A central aspect in implementing the concept is the required amount of BEV in dependence on the mix of branches. A significant BEV-pool is provided to the companies by the park operator itself. Furthermore it is expected that the companies and employees will hold own BEV – as the market is emerging – and make them available to the energy management of the park – as (i) bi-directional micro cycles increase lithium batteries' life spans [B. Lunz et al., Energy Policy 46 (2012)] and (ii) a business case will be established: Since the park's electricity management system gets access to gratis storages, buffering can be priced. Technical, economic, and regulatory obstacles are objects of research.
Currently, the definition of the definite development plan is being finished. Construction phase will start in summer 2015. So far, mobility demands of several branches have been collected and included in the development of the park's energy management system. The park development is supported and evaluated by qualitative and quantitative social science to achieve acceptance during development and transferability of the concept to further commercial areas. The evaluation progress will begin with having first companies starting business activities.
The project is funded by Federal Government Research Program "Schaufenster Elektromobilität" and the Baden-Württemberg Ministry of the Environment.

Publisher

Association for European Transport