Which Public Policies to Enhance Waterborne Urban Freight Transport ? Cases Analysis in Paris Region (France) and Flanders (Belgium)



Which Public Policies to Enhance Waterborne Urban Freight Transport ? Cases Analysis in Paris Region (France) and Flanders (Belgium)

Authors

Baudry, Cerema, Territorial Division for the Northern and Picardie Regions, Turminel, Université Lille 1

Description

In Flanders and Paris Region, there are several waterborne urban freight transport services. The present paper focuses on public policies based on studies and on stakeholder’s interviews. This approach covers multi-level governance.

Abstract

Urban freight transport is essential to the competitiveness of all services in cities but the negative impacts that it imposes, pollutant emissions and their physical consequences on public health, have received growing attention in recent years. Policy makers set goals for sustainable development transportation.
In a few areas in Europe such as Netherlands, Flanders (Belgium) and Paris Region (France), Inland waterways are used for transportation of goods into and/or within cities and are recognized for their contribution towards sustainable development. Beneficial public policies seem to be necessary to develop waterborne urban freight transport systems.
The assessment of the effectiveness of transport public policies used especially modelling and cost-benefit analysis. The present paper focuses on cases analysis based on studies and on stakeholder’s interviews.
This cases analysis is about several waterborne urban freight transport systems in Paris Region (France) and Flanders (Belgium). The goods are building materials, foodstuffs and package. Either are palletised for transportation or placed in containers. In France, “Voies navigables de France” (the public body in charge of inland waterways of France) developed a national policy for inland waterways transport of goods and “Ports de Paris” (the public body in charge of Paris Region inland ports) has been an important stakeholder to develop recent waterborne urban freight transport systems.
This approach covers multi-level governance and sectoral policy domains, relationships between stakeholders, business plans and urban planning. It develops existing work realised by Territorial Division for the Northern and Picardie Regions of Cerema (Centre for studies and expertise on Risks, Environment, Mobility, and Urban and Country Planning). Some studies are still in progress but already provided some knowledge. For instance, all waterborne urban freight transport needed beneficial relationships between all stakeholders to design a supply chain and to find a business plan. In Paris, Urban Planning has been very important to preserve waterfront infrastructures installations used today.

Publisher

Association for European Transport