Developing Sustainable Transport Projects in West London: Green Routes into Green Areas



Developing Sustainable Transport Projects in West London: Green Routes into Green Areas

Authors

SEALE K, London Transport Buses and BULL D, London Borough of Hounslow, UK

Description

ÒThe Government believes that new measures to reduce the environmental impacts of transport should be given a high priority, which will need to include policies to influence the rate of trafic growth ... However there is an important issue of how far such

Abstract

ÒThe Government believes that new measures to reduce the environmental impacts of transport should be given a high priority, which will need to include policies to influence the rate of trafic growth ... However there is an important issue of how far such action can be reconciled with the needs of business - and individuals - for an < eficient transport networkÓ (Transport, The Way Forward, Department of Transport, 1996)

Five years after the declaration of the ÒNew ConsensusÓ in transport planning that consensus looks healthier than ever. The GovernmentÕs recent Green Paper (DOT, 1996) emphasises the need to make more efficient use of transport infrasiructure, reduce dependence on the car and switch spending from roads to public transport. The consensus has reached a point where even organisations such as the Automobile Association now advocate investment in public transport. While consensus flows freely, however, action is harder to find. There are several reasons for this. This paper will attempt to examine the constraints on implementing more environmentally friendly transport policies and suggest a way in which they might be overcome. It will go on to report on work that has begun in London to develop a new approach and implement radical measures.

After one of the, now common, air quality scares in London, ideas such as the of banning all cars from driving in London were seriously canvassed. Although attention quickly passed on to other things, this example indicates that the traffic engineering and transport planning professions must work hard to keep up with the changing aspirations of the public. Failure to do so will could see years of careful work swept away in a panic reaction. This paper will argue that the concerns of the public can be addressed and conflicting objectives such as the environment and economic development reconciled. But this will require fresh thinking and a preparedness to approach problems in a new way. It is hoped that this paper will help to point the way.

Publisher

Association for European Transport