Use of Mobility Stations to Reach a City-friendly Urban Mobility



Use of Mobility Stations to Reach a City-friendly Urban Mobility

Authors

Dr. Bodo Schwieger, team red Deutschland GmbH, Luise Fremder, team red Deutschland GmbH

Description

Mobility stations promote multi- and intermodality and in a few German cities they are already a reality. This paper addresses the question whether mobility stations are a solution to be generally adopted in German cities to reduce traffic problems.

Abstract

In order to meet the challenges of urban transport, new mobility concepts to reorganize or restructure urban traffic are required. Mobility stations belong to these concepts.

Mobility stations promote multi- and intermodality. Several means of transport are linked in one point, so that short transfer distances and times are possible. The combination of public transport with other means of transport like carsharing, bike rental or taxi is simplified and integrated into everyday journeys, facilitating modal shift to sustainable modes and providing a viable alternative to private cars. Mobility stations differ in size and complexity according to the requirements of the station.

In a few German cities mobility stations are already a reality. The so called “mobil.punkte” were first stablished in Bremen in 2003, where they have already showed evidence of solving parking issues. In early 2013, more mobility stations were established in Hamburg under the name "switchh" and in November 2014 the first mobility station was opened in Munich at the subway station "Münchner Freiheit".

Now the question arises whether mobility stations are a solution to be generally adopted in German cities to reduce traffic problems. In November and December 2014 and in order to answer this question, team red Deutschland GmbH conducted expert interviews among public authorities in 4 different German cities and an online survey among a relevant selection of 110 individuals from local governments, transport associations and consulting companies around Germany. The focus of the expert interviews was on the expected positive effects of mobility stations, their viability and the potential best locations within each city. The objective of the online survey was to gain an overview of the opinions and positions on mobility stations regarding their future importance in transport policy and planning, their possible impact on modal split and more detailed issues such as financing possibilities and the use of mobility cards.

The characteristics, analysis and results of both studies will be presented in this paper. Since the German Federal Government is about to support the introduction of mobility stations within the framework of its policy for environmental protection, the conclusions drawn are highly interesting in order to know whether German municipalities and public transport operators are adequately prepared to introduce this concept.

Publisher

Association for European Transport