Daily and Long-distance Travel in Germany – A Comparison Between Urban and Rural Population



Daily and Long-distance Travel in Germany – A Comparison Between Urban and Rural Population

Authors

Alexander Reichert, Transport Planning, Faculty of Spatial Planning, University of Dortmund, Christian Holz-Rau, Transport Planning, Faculty of Spatial Planning, University of Dortmund, Christian Holz-Rau, Transport Planning

Description

This presentation compares the travel behaviour of the rural and the urban population in terms of mode use, covered distances and produced emissions in daily and long-distance travel.

Abstract

From other studies which examine travel behaviour, it is well known that urban population cover shorter distances, use more environmentally friendly modes and produce fewer emissions in daily travel in Germany and other European countries. However, these studies often exclude long-distance travel, which accounts for more than 50 per cent of the climate impact caused by travel. Recent analyses focusing on long-distance travel reveal a different picture. In long-distance travel, the urban population undertakes more long-distance trips and covers longer distances per trip. They may use the public transport system more frequently but this also applies to trips by air. All in all, urban population produces more emissions in long-distance travel than the rural population.
The project “Daily trips and long-distance travel – simultaneous analysis of social and spatial influences on passenger transport”, started in 2012, examines the travel behaviour of more than 30.000 persons. The data base is the national survey “Mobility in Germany” from 2008 which provides, apart from daily travel data, a separate module with information on long-distance travel. Furthermore, it contains a broad range of various socio-demographic and socio-economic attributes of the individuals and spatial attributes of their residences. Based on that data, multivariate analyses are carried out to examine the effect of spatial characteristics on daily and long-distance travel. As control variables socio-demographic and socio-economic variables are included.
This presentation compares the travel behaviour of the rural and the urban population in terms of mode use, covered distances and produced emissions in daily and long-distance travel. Additionally, the analysis is differentiated between leisure and business trips. Furthermore, the presentation will provide a comparison of the climate impact of daily and long-distance travel. Thus, it answers the question whether the urban population travels more environmentally-friendly than the rural population, even if long-distance travel is considered in the balance.

Publisher

Association for European Transport