Multimodal Modelling of Tirreno-Brenner Freight Transport Corridor



Multimodal Modelling of Tirreno-Brenner Freight Transport Corridor

Authors

RIGHETTI G, D'Apmademedia spa and BON G, Uniontrasporti, Italy

Description

The strategy of the European Union and Italian Ministry regarding freight transport is based on the modernization of existing rail lines, mainly through the introduction of innovative measures to encourage intermodal "combined" transport. This is an effec

Abstract

The strategy of the European Union and Italian Ministry regarding freight transport is based on the modernization of existing rail lines, mainly through the introduction of innovative measures to encourage intermodal "combined" transport. This is an effective approach particularly in the following two cases:

* in situations of high traffic density (congested roads)

* when the route starts from, or passes through a harbour.

Both situations apply to the link between the Italian northern Tirreno Sea ports and the north-eastern parts of Italy (Veneto regions up to Brenner pass). The ideal shortest- path line (Figure 1) is composed of a sequence of "weak" road links and another sequence of disconnected local rail lines (Figure 2). The trade routes currently used between these areas are highly congested and much more expensive (in both length and travel time) than the potential direct connection.

This aspect is of even greater importance if we enlarge the point of view to include the "sea-land corridor" linking the western Mediterranean regions to Eastern Europe. Much of.this traffic presently uses the longer routes along the Adriatic sea or even through the North sea ports (as an example, the distance between Gibraltar and Verona is 3070 km length if landing at Ravenna, compared to only 1670 km when landing at La Spezia). It is noted that the total amount of freight traffic between the two sectors (south-west and north-east, Figure 3) is more than 100 million tons/year; presently only 15% of this cargo lands at the north Tirrenian ports. This "gee-anomaly" can be corrected through interventions such as the constitution of a Tirreno Sea- Brenner (TIBRE) Corridor.

Thus far, only a part of the TIBRE corridor is included in the planned european rail network for the year 2000, notably the so-called "Pontremolese" rail line and the AI5 highway (connecting La Spezia to Parma). The potential of "closing the chain" by a direct connection between La Spezia and Verona has been demonstrated by evaluation of available data and by the results of a transportation study.

Publisher

Association for European Transport