Sustainable Mobility: Is the Public Transport System Inherently Sustainable?



Sustainable Mobility: Is the Public Transport System Inherently Sustainable?

Authors

Gisela Gräfin Von Schlieffen, Rhein-Main-Verkehrsverbund GmbH

Description

This paper will show the extent to which the public transport system is inherently sustainable and also to analyse what measures taken by RMV, through its corporate responsibility, constitute an effective contribution to sustainability.

Abstract

Rapidly changing technological and social trends, demographic changes, new forms of mobility, competition and the increasingly complex interfaces between companies, customers, authorities and owners are just some of the challenges that public transport operators have to face every day.

Discussions of climate change and the over-exploitation of the environment and society coupled with a discernible change in customer behaviour have once again brought the concept of sustainability to the centre of attention.

In its capacity as a regional mobility provider, RMV has an influence on society in the state of Hesse. Stakeholders expect our company to operate as a "successful and socially accepted entrepreneur that makes an active contribution to sustainability".

The following exposition is intended to show the extent to which the public transport system is inherently sustainable and also to analyse what measures taken by RMV, through its corporate responsibility, constitute an effective contribution to sustainability.

Sustainability is not a new concept, it is a programmatic principle for action. The principle of sustainability was first formulated some 300 years ago. In 1713, Hans Carl von Carlowitz strongly recommended that only so much wood should be cut down as could grow back through planned afforestation and replanting. For this reason he is regarded as the creator of the concept of “sustainable forestry”.

Nowadays, sustainability is defined using three aspects: ecological, environmental and social.

In the presentation it will be shown that public transport is the backbone of sustainable mobility for citizens in the area of the regional mobility network. Expanding it generates general improvements in environmental and climate protection, increases the mobility and social participation of all segments of the population, and is a significant factor in the regional and local economy. According to all three criteria, public transport can thus be generally considered to be sustainable. In all three impact areas it is clear that RMV also takes a variety of measures in order to operate sustainably.

Publisher

Association for European Transport