Major Highway Schemes from Development Funding-examples from West Sussex



Major Highway Schemes from Development Funding-examples from West Sussex

Authors

McKENNA C, West Sussex County Council, UK

Description

West Sussex is a county in Southern England with a shoreline of the English Channel between, but not including, Portsmouth and Brighton. It contains a number of medium sized towns such as, Chichester, Crawley, Bognor Regis, East Grinstead, Haywards Heath,

Abstract

West Sussex is a county in Southern England with a shoreline of the English Channel between, but not including, Portsmouth and Brighton. It contains a number of medium sized towns such as, Chichester, Crawley, Bognor Regis, East Grinstead, Haywards Heath, Littlehampton, Shoreham and Worthing, but is otherwise rural in nature, an exception being Gatwick Airport. In the European context it is classified as rural. Its population is 740,000 with an estimated growth to 755,000 in five years.

The County Council is the highway authority for all public roads except for Trunk Roads and motorways (A27 and A23). It is also the Strategic Planning Authority responsible for developing and approving a Structure Plan. There are two tiers of local government below the County level: District and Borough Councils of which there are 7 and Town and Parish Councils of which there are more than 150. District and Borough Councils are Local Planning Authorities responsible for Local Plans in conformity with the Structure Plan and for determining most planning applications.

The County Council is also responsible for determining planning applications for schools, minerals and waste sites and for highway improvements which it promotes. Parish Councils are consulted on planning applications and have tax raising powers for local amenities such as recreational facilities and street lighting.

It is believed that West Sussex had the first fully funded developer funded bypass scheme in the Country - the Broadbridge Heath Bypass (Phase 1) opened in 1983. This was required to enable new housing development to proceed as well as providing relief for a local community. The scheme cost £2.6m and it was a relatively straight forward development funded scheme in accordance with the Town & County Planning Act. Planning permission was granted subject to the provision of the bypass and other community benefits and the landowner and developer accepted the scale of contribution required. A subsequent superstore development contributed to part dualling of the scheme (Phase I1).

Since then, the approach has been used to fund more illajor road improvements from a variety of developments. A case study is made of two linked schemes - the Burgess Hill Western Distributor Road and the Burgess Hill Link Road. Both have been completed and open to traffic: the first funded totally from development funding; the second part funded from development. The successful outcome of these two schemes is contrasted with the unsuccessful attempt for development funding of the Ashington Bypass. The approach being taken to the funding of two further schemes: the Billingshurst Bypass and the Angmering Bypass (£5.0m) is also outlined. From the approaches to date some general lessons of wider significance are drawn.

Publisher

Association for European Transport